Overview of U.S. Crime Statistics, 2017

Because crime affects different areas in different ways, looking at and trying to make sense of crime statistics for the population as a whole can be incredibly confusing. After researching a variety of fact sources, we had quite a bit of uncertainty about what these facts actually meant. We wanted to provide clear answers about what might (or might not) be contributing to crime in the U.S.

Below you'll find our summaries of a few of the most frequently cited crime facts. These were drawn from what we deemed to be the most common pattern amongst our sources.

Cities over 1,000,000 residents have the biggest increase in crime rates.

In 2015, violent crime rose by 3.9 percent while property crimes have decreased by 2.6 percent. However, this increase has not occurred uniformly throughout the U.S. Cities such as Baltimore, Chicago, and Washington D.C. have had 244 more murders which make up around half of the rise in murders. In fact, Chicago alone has seen a 59 increase in murders which accounts for 40 percent of the rise. With this information, one would expect to see Illinois having the highest violent crime rate of all the states, but Alaska has the highest (730 per 100,000 people). Bigger cities have been impacted by decreasing populations and higher poverty and unemployment rates than the national average.

Drug addiction causes people to commit crimes.

Drug use has always been a problem in the U.S. with 12.7% of all arrests being for drug abuse violations. In 2004, 17% of state prisoners and 18% of federal inmates said they did their crime in order to have money for drugs. For violent crime, only 3.9% of homicides were narcotics related. With the opioid crisis becoming a bigger national problem, similar crimes could be on the rise. In 2015, opioid deaths and heroin deaths increased by 15% and 23% respectively.

More cops mean a decrease in crime rates.

There is much debate over whether having more cops decreases crime rates. According to a Princeton study, an additional officer prevents 2.9 violent crimes and 16.23 property crimes annually. However, this depends on the training of the police officer, the amount of money spent on policing, and how the officers are used in their communities.

More prisons cause inverse effects.

Within three years of release, about two-thirds (67.8 percent) of released prisoners were rearrested. Within five years of release, about three-quarters (76.6 percent) of released prisoners were rearrested. Of those prisoners who were rearrested, more than half (56.7 percent) were arrested by the end of the first year. It has also been shown that harsher prison sentences increases the likelihood of a reoffense.

Property crimes are decreasing.

Even though there was a slight increase in violent crimes, property crimes have been decreasing consistently. Property crime decreased 3.9 percent in nonmetropolitan counties and 1.5 percent in metropolitan counties. The state with the highest property crime rate in 2015 is New Mexico with 3697 property crimes per 100,000 people.

The Ultimate Guide to Dating Safely

In the United States, 44% of adults are single – with 40 million Americans using online dating services.

Although online dating may be a relatively new concept, dating itself is an age-old method of getting to know someone before committing to anything more serious. But with the growth of the Internet, new technologies, chat facilities, and the acceptance of meeting people online, there has also been a rise in the number of risks people are exposing themselves to.

In this guide, we’ll explore the potential dangers of dating before offering some helpful tips on how you can stay safe when meeting someone online or going on a date for the first time. We’ll also include some apps that help you date safely, and additional resources you can explore for more sound advice.

Statistics About the Dangers of Dating

Cast your mind back 50 years, and you’d find singletons donning their best suits and dancing shoes, cruising around discos and bars to find “the one.” However, today, only 9% of women and 2% of men find a long-lasting relationship in a bar.

Instead, 63% of married couples say they met each other through a friend, while 27% of 18- to 24-year-olds have turned to online dating (an increase from 10% in 2013). A sign of the times, perhaps?

However, with this growth of online dating and meeting people you’ve never met (and neither have your family or friends) comes risks, which are added to with other risks many people who are dating face, particularly if they’re teenagers.

Here are some statistics about the risks and threats posed by dating:

Dating Abuse in Adults

Teenagers and Adolescents

  • Every year, physical abuse is suffered by almost 1.5 million high school students from their dating partner
  • A third of adolescents in the US are a victim of verbal, emotional, sexual, or physical abuse at the hands of their dating partner (far outweighing any other forms of youth violence)
  • A tenth of high school students have been purposefully slapped, hit, or physically hurt by their girlfriend or boyfriend
  • Girls and young women between 16- and 24-years-old account for the highest rate of intimate partner violence (this is almost three times the national average)
  • 43% of women who are dating at college report experiencing abusive and violent dating behaviors
  • When it comes to dating abuse, college students aren’t able to deal with it, with 58% saying they don’t know what to do to help someone going through abuse and 57% saying it’s difficult to identify it
  • 16% of college women in a dating relationship have been sexually abused
  • Only 33% of teens have told someone about the abuse they suffered when they’ve been in a violent relationship
  • A study in Hong Kong found those using dating apps were twice as likely to be sexually abused than non-users
  • 14% of women and 4% of men report being sexually assaulted while being incapacitated
  • Before an incident of unwanted sexual contact or sexual assault in college, 62% of students had been drinking alcohol

Online Dating

  • 53% of people admit to lying on their online dating profile – men tend to add up to two inches to their height while women take around 10 pounds off their weight
  • 42% of women and 17% of men have had a bad experience with online dating
  • 28% of online daters have felt uncomfortable or harassed by the way they’ve been contacted by someone on a dating app or online
  • 10% of sex offenders use online dating to meet new people
  • 53% of people say they’ve dated more than one person at the same time
  • In 2016, the number of cases of romance scams or confidence fraud reached almost 15,000 (a rise in 2,500 cases from 2015) with the losses from these scams exceeding $230 million
  • The average financial loss from an online dating scam ranges from $5,000 to $10,000 but many victims have lost as much as $400,000

Top Tips for Staying Safe on Your Date

Even though the above statistics make for worrying reading, it shouldn’t stop you from going out there and meeting people. Instead, they should just emphasize how important it is to remain vigilant at all times during the dating process – no matter how long you’ve known the person for.

To stay safe, there are a number of things you can do:

  • Always Keep Friends and Family Up to Date – Never go on a date with someone without telling a loved one where you’re going, who with (even giving them your date’s name and number), and what time they should expect you home. If something does change while you’re out, be sure to update them straight away.
  • Use Your Own Transport – This is particularly important if you’re meeting someone you don’t know, and it could save your life. Get in your own car or Uber it so you have a quick escape route if things aren’t going to plan – and it means your date won’t know your home address.
  • Meet in a Mutual, Safe Environment – As fun as it may be to “Netflix and chill” with someone you can’t wait to meet, it’s not a good idea to go to someone’s house if you don’t know them. Always meet them in a public place (a coffee shop or restaurant you’re familiar with, for example) where you know there’ll be plenty of people around. This not only reduces your risk of finding yourself in an unsafe situation but it also means other people may remember seeing you at this location if something does go wrong.
  • Never Leave Your Drink or Food Unattended – Although you might need to powder your nose or ring your friend to tell them how hot your date is, never leave your food or drink unattended when you first meet someone. Roofies (Rohypnol) and GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate) are common date rape drugs and are colorless and odorless, which makes them hard to detect. Once consumed, they make you feel incredibly disorientated, so always watch your drink being made by the bartender, never accepting something you aren’t sure about.
  • Limit Your Alcohol Intake – As much as the above date rape drugs are an issue, the number one date rape drug is alcohol. So, limit yourself to a couple of drinks at the most while you’re out with someone. Alcohol can lower your inhibitions and make you more susceptible to a predator’s motives – e.g. taking you away from the public place you’ve met in.
  • Organize a Group Date – Although this might not be possible, going on a group date can significantly reduce the risks of meeting someone you don’t know. If you can, take your mate along with you so you’ve got two pairs of eyes on drinks etc. Plus, you’ll have their second opinion on whether your date is worth seeing again or not.
  • Take Some Protection with You – Even though a third of singletons have had sex BEFORE their first date, the protection we’re referring to isn’t just condoms. Rather, we’re talking about good, old-fashioned pepper spray. OK, so this may seem a little over the top, but having that reassurance when you’re heading out on a first date will make sure you’re prepared for all eventualities.
  • Don’t Tell Any Lies – We’ve already seen how common it is for people to lie on their online dating profiles, but try to refrain from overselling yourself on your dating app or site. Sharing pictures that are years old or elaborating the truth isn’t impressive when the real you comes out and could lead to aggressive or angry behaviors from your date.
  • Focus on the Here and Now – When we’re dating, it’s easy to get carried away, especially when we really like someone. Are they “the one,” have you found the father of your unborn child, and will you finally be walking down the aisle… Don’t let your thoughts run away with themselves and focus on getting to know the person first. Lust can often cloud our initial judgments, so try to use some caution, especially on the first few dates.
  • Do a Google Search – Finally, if all else fails, do a Google search for your date. Find some questionable information or start to get a bad feeling about them? Then it’s probably worth ditching this person before you get yourself into a sticky situation. Don’t forget to check out LinkedIn and Facebook pages, too, just to make sure they are who they say they are (and if they’ve only got one or two friends on these pages, that should tell you something as well).

Top Tips for Staying Safe When Dating Online

By 2040, it’s anticipated that 70% of us will have met “the one” online, and one study revealed that online dating leads to happier, longer marriages. So things ain’t all bad in the world of online dating!

However, along with the above tips, there are a few extra steps you can take to stay safe:

  • Choose an Anonymous Username – Never include your surname or any other personal information in the username of your profile.
  • Never Reveal Your Personal Information – You may need to give out your contact number and name when you decide to meet someone but try to limit how often you do this. You can always contact them on the site until you feel comfortable you know who they are – and if you do want to give out an email address, think about setting up a specific “dating email address” they can contact you through, making sure no personal details (i.e. your surname) are included in the address.
  • Trust Your Gut Instinct – If, during your chats online, something makes you question your potential date or they say something inappropriate, listen to your gut instinct. Anything that rings alarm bells should be taken seriously.
  • Speak to Them on the Phone – Firing emails and chat messages back and forth can be exhilarating but it doesn’t often give you a good overview of a person – and it doesn’t confirm they are who they say they are. So, before you meet them in person, ask to speak to them on the phone first. Practice your banter and get chatting.
  • Be Mindful of Unusual Language – Unfortunately, there are a lot of scammers out there, which is why you’ll want to keep your eyes peeled for any unusual language your online daters are using. When their English sounds broken, think about those dodgy “Nigerian prince” emails we’ve all received and delete the contact.
  • Look for Mutual Friends on Facebook – Once you know the name of your potential date, search for them on Facebook to see if you’ve got any mutual friends. If you have, consider contacting this mutual friend to see what they think to your date. Having someone’s second opinion can really boost your confidence and give you the reassurance you need that this is a legitimate person who doesn’t have a chequered past.
  • Delete and Block Anyone You’re Not Sure Of – If you start to feel uneasy about someone, block and delete them from your profile. Receive an inappropriate or abusive message? Report them straight away.
  • Be Wary of Scammers – If someone declares their love for you a little too quickly or they ask you for money (or offer you money for that fact), be very wary. These are common behaviors of scammers and there’s only one thing they’re after – money. As hard as it may be, always hold back when you meet someone and try not to fall for any cliched sob stories. And never give out your bank details.
  • Take Your Time – It’s difficult to know how quickly you should arrange to meet up with someone you’ve met online, which is why there’s no given rule as to how long you should leave it before you arrange your first date. However, a study suggests you shouldn’t wait too long. American researchers found that, after the first message is sent, the tipping point for your first meeting comes at around 17 to 23 days into your conversation. The longer the respondents of the survey waited, the more disappointed they were with their first date.
  • Tread Carefully with Long-Distance Rendezvous – Due to the large number of people around the world who are dating online, it’s highly likely you could meet someone who’s not from your neck of the woods. Therefore, when you do decide to meet, you may be staying away from home. And if you are, always stay in a hotel rather than at your date’s house or somewhere they recommend. Never meet at this hotel and don’t tell the person where you’re staying.

Top Tools Apps for Dating Safely

Thankfully, a number of companies have made it much easier for you to date safely, whether they help you check out how legitimate someone is or reassure you that you’ll be safe on your date.

Here’s our top pick of dating tools:

TinEye A lot of scammers will try and be clever with the photos they use, often stealing them from Facebook. So, use TinEye to search for this image on the Internet to see where else it’s appearing. If you see a result that suggests your hot date isn’t who he said he is, proceed with caution, they’ve probably created a catfish profile. You can also use Google’s Reverse Image Checker in much the same way.

PiplAs the largest people search engine, Pipl allows you to find out what person’s behind a phone number, social username, or email address. It can be incredibly accurate but can also pull up other potential profiles (especially if someone has the same name or a similar social username to someone else), so don’t jump to conclusions straight away if you can’t find the person you’re looking for.

Find My Friends AppThis app allows you to track people through their phone, and while this might sound uber-stalkerish, it’s a great way of making sure you and your friends are safe. Install this on your phone before you go on a date and make sure your friend or family member can track you at all times. That way, they’ll be able to see you are where you should be – and can always book a cab if you need them to in an emergency.

Watch Over Me AppAvailable for free on Android and Apple devices, this app is turned on when you aren’t feeling safe. All you need to do is switch it on, specify how long you want the app to watch you for, share some details, and then tell the app when you’re safe. If you don’t hit the “I’m Safe” button before the end of your specified time, the app will notify your loved ones. They’ll be given your precise location along with any videos or pictures you’ve uploaded.

And if you aren’t able to call someone when you are in danger, you can shake the phone to activate alerts to your emergency contacts. It’ll even notify you when you’re entering a high-crime area!

Whitepages If you get hold of your date’s phone number, you can do a check on Whitepages to see if their name matches what they’ve given you. Just use the reverse phone search to find out more information about the person who has that mobile number. You can also search by their name and state/city.

Scam DiggerLook through a list of online profiles that have been found to be scams.

Email Address of ScammersOn datingnmore.com you can see a list of email addresses that have been flagged as scammers.

CriminalCheck.comWhen you’re really unsure about someone, you can use this website to do a national search for sex offenders. This is free to do and all you need is a name and zip code.

Additional Resources

Want to read more about dating safely or need some advice on how to protect your teen in the dating world? These further resources are jam-packed full of useful information:

Dating for Dummies Cheat Sheet – Here you’ll not only find tips for making safe connections online but advice on how to ask for a first date, too. It also includes some tips on how to flirt on your first date and how to date with confidence.  

Staying Safe in Relationships – Produced by the NOAA Workforce Management Office, this relationship safety guide shows you how to stay safe in relationships. It also provides some safe dating tips for teens, which are great for parents, too.

How to Protect Your Online Dating Profile – This guide provides some incredibly useful tips on how you can protect your online profile from hackers and stalkers. It includes things you need to look out for, how to protect your images, and the importance of not oversharing your information.

How to Use the Internet to Investigate Your Next Date – If you think you need to play detective, this guide tells you just how to do this. It offers great tips on where you can check out how legitimate someone is without them knowing.

How to Spot a Dating Scam – Wary about being caught up in an online dating scam? This guide tells you what warning signs there may be, what communication issues to look out for, and when to delete this contact from your profile.

A Mom’s Guide to Protecting A Teenager When They’re Dating – Because dating has changed so dramatically since most parents were teenagers themselves, it can be difficult to relate to the experiences teenagers are going through. This guide explains some of the ways things have changed and how, as a Mom, you can deal with these and protect your child.

Protecting Teens from Abusive Relationships and Teen Violence – As a parent, you don’t want to think about worst-case scenarios, but it’s important to be clued up so you can protect your child. This guide explains the risks of teenage relationships, the warning signs your teen may be in an abusive relationship, and how to effectively help your child.

Which? Guide to Staying Safe on Dating Websites and Apps – Read advice on how to stay safe while online dating. You’ll also find some helpful information on how to spot and report fake online profiles (in the UK).

Poll: College Sexual Assault – For more statistics on the growing issue of sexual assault and unwanted sexual contact in college, read this article by the Washington Post. It revealed that a fifth of women report having been sexually assaulted while at college.

History of Labor Day

The wrong reputation

Summer is technically over on the Autumn Solstice (between the 21st and 24th of September) but for many, Labor Day (September 4th) heralds the beginning of the end, causing many to view it through a bittersweet lens. Many forget that Labor Day was not created to signal the end of a season, it was meant to signal the end of worker oppression.

Labor Day honors the long and toiled history of labor in the United States. Before the 8-hour workday, people typically worked 10 to 16 hour days, 6 days a week and -- despite laws being passed -- endured years of poor working conditions and strikes for their rights. Labor Day recognizes the strength and appreciation of the American workforce.

In an effort to spur and support worker’s rights, the first Labor Day celebration was held on September 5, 1882. In 1887, the first state to make Labor Day a holiday was Oregon, with New Jersey, New York, and Colorado following suit. In 1894, after public outcry over the death of workers during the Pullman Strike, President Grover Cleveland made it a national holiday and a symbol of the Labor Movement.

The wrong representative?

There’s still debate over who actually founded Labor Day: Peter J. McGuire (the man with the plan) or Matthew Maguire (the man who acted on the plan).

Peter J. McGuire was the founder of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and co-founder of the American Federation of Labor (AFL). He led a series of strikes that led to the enforcement of the 8-hour workday law (originally passed in 1868, by the way). On a trip to Toronto, he observed a Canadian Labor Day celebration where 1/10 of the population of Toronto marched for unions and better labor laws. Inspired, he suggested that the Central Labor Union of New York do the same.

Working as Secretary of the Central Labor Union of New York, Matthew Maguire (note the different spelling of the last name) organized that very first Labor Day parade. A machinist and radical figure in the Socialist Labor Party of America, he also led strikes in the 1870s against working conditions and long hours.

Whether a conflict of interest or an interest in avoiding conflict, Samuel Gompers, co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, gave the “founder” title to his other co-founder, Peter J. McGuire.

Regardless, wrong finally goes right

The early hours of the first Labor Day parade saw low attendance due to worried workers losing money - or their jobs. However, it’s said that once the band started playing, an estimated 10,000 to 20,000 people showed up. After the parade ended, some went back to work while others continued the celebration in Wendel’s Elm Park. The party lasted until 9 p.m. and included food, speeches, and a lot of beer.

Parades were the common way to celebrate holidays and were typically followed by festivals around town - after parties if you will. The Labor Day festivals eventually grew so big that they became hard to maintain. To solidify the meaning or simply maintain order, organizers began to focus less on beer and more on speeches about the economic and political significance of worker achievements. Labor Sunday was also established to focus on the spiritual and economic achievements of the Workers Movement.

The beginning of the end

Through the past century, Labor Day has seemed to achieve the opposite of its intended effect. Relaxation has become rushed and an “enjoy it while you can” mindset has taken over (perhaps that mindset was always there, but for a different reason).

  • Many take their vacation days to have one last getaway with family before the school year begins.
  • Less summer means less time off, and so amusement parks and other harbingers of fun close after Labor Day.
  • Somehow Labor Day signifies when people switch to their fall and winter clothes, so hurry up and wear out the white.
  • Fall’s favorite sport, NCAA football, holds its first games during Labor Day weekend, the NFL the weekend after.
  • Recently, Labor Day has become an important weekend for end-of-summer and back-to-school sales - the ultimate rush.

Although the way Labor Day is celebrated has changed, it’s important to take the time to remember and appreciate the fact that we don’t work 12-hour days and have better working conditions, so enjoy that day of rest before it’s back to being “busy.”

US Census Guide: How to Get the Most Out of Census.gov

If you ever visited Census.gov before it was updated you’d have found the process of sifting through the plentiful information about America’s economy, places, and people incredibly time-consuming and difficult. Thankfully, the website has been updated, which has made it slightly easier to navigate. However, with so much information available, it’s still easy to miss key features or you may struggle to pinpoint the data you’re looking for.

Therefore, to help get you started and to make sure you’re getting the most out of Census.gov, we’ve put together this handy guide which will show you how to navigate the site and get the results you’re looking for.

Using the Navigation Bar

At the top of the site, you’ll see a navigation bar which contains the links, “Topics,” “Geography,” “Library,” “Data,” “Surveys/Programs,” “Newsrooms,” and “About Us.” So, let’s take a look at each of these to see what you’ll find in each section.

Using the Topics Feature on Census.gov

When you click on the “Topics” tab at the top of the homepage, this presents you with a drop-down bar with a number of further options. These contain the economic and demographic content within certain areas of interest, including population, education, income and poverty, and health.

Clicking on one of these will provide you with a further breakdown of the statistics that are available for this area. For example, if you click on ‘Health,’ this presents you with several more options, including Disability, Expenses and Investments, Fertility, Health Care Industries, Health Insurance, HIV/AIDS, Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE), and Social Assistance Industries. As you click into each of these categories you’ll be taken to a new page that’s dedicated entirely to this area. At the top of the page, you’ll see an overview of what the statistics include along with any new releases that are available.

When you’ve found your chosen area and have clicked on it, you can go into much more detail using the additional tabs and sections within each sub-category. For example, on the Disability page, you’ll find information about the data that’s collected, how it’s collected, and what publications have been released. For further information on the specific area, there are also links to related sites or you can contact the team for more information.

Alternatively, if you just want an overview of one of the main categories (e.g. Health) and don’t want to go into a specific sub-category, you can enter the main page by clicking on “[CATEGORY NAME] main” in the white box that’s on the left-hand side of the drop-down within each section. This provides you with a general overview of the data that’s been collected, any news stories, recent publications, new surveys/programs, working papers, and so on.

Using the Geography Feature on Census.gov

Clicking on the “Geography” tab opens up some more possibilities for your data search. Here you’ll find access to an overview of the geography section of the website, “Geography Main.” Or you can refine your search by clicking on the various features available.

This includes cool interactive maps that display things like populations; education tools like blogs and brochures; metropolitan and micropolitan information; and further details on the Geographic Support System Initiative (GSS-I).

Using the Library Feature on Census.gov

For photos, videos, and audio tools, you’ll need to click on the “Library” tab. Here you’ll find access to all the available publications, infographics, and audio/visual tools available.

For example, if you click into the infographics section you’ll be able to see the latest ones that have been published. Codes for each of these are available so you can embed these into your own website to provide a cool graphic for your visitors.

All of the multimedia available within this section is sorted by their date of release.

Using the Data Feature on Census.gov

Under the “Data” tab you’ll find some great tools that help you find the data you’re looking for. (We’ll delve into the QuickFacts section of the site in more detail below.)

Within this section, you will find more sub-categories that allow you to explore different areas of the site. Helpful tools (like the QuickFacts feature) are located under the tab “Data Tools & Apps,” but you’ll also find a section that’s dedicated to developers.

The developers’ section of Census.gov has been designed to help provide greater access to the stats and data the website’s got available. Therefore, within this section developers can use the application programming interface (API) to reach new users and create custom apps by incorporating the stats found on the website into their own designs. For example, a developer may use the stats to show what commuting patterns there are in a particular American city, or they may show how many homeowners there are within a certain neighborhood.

However, if you’re not a developer, you can gain instant access to some of the apps that are already available. Contained in the “Mobile Apps” section you’ll find a number of free apps that help you process the information that’s available on the site. Or, if you fancy putting your knowledge to the test, you might like to download the Census PoP Quiz!

Furthermore, in the “Software” sub-category you’ll also find some free software that allows you to process, map, extract, display, and/or create tables from the survey and census data.

There’s also a “Product Catalogs” section where you’ll find information that’s been separated into key subject categories (e.g. Business and Industry, Geography, and Housing). Within these sections, you’ll find publications in print, CDs, DVDs, certification services, and reference files and maps.

Finally, for information on combining data and where you can get more training or attend workshops, you’ll need to be in the “Training & Workshops” section.

You can also access to the visual tools through this Data section, too.

Using the Surveys/Programs Feature on Census.gov

To gain instant access to the surveys and programs that have been run throughout the U.S., click on the tab for “Surveys/Programs”. Through the drop-down menu, you can access all of the surveys available, which include the 2010 and 2020 Census, the American Housing Survey (AHS), the Economic Census, and so on.

Clicking on the relevant one will take you straight to the relevant survey while also providing you with more information on the survey. For example, in the 2020 Census section, you’ll find details on things like research and testing, the latest news, and a monthly status report.

If you’re not sure what survey or program you want, you can click on the tab that shows “All Surveys & Programs.” Displayed in alphabetical order, there are over one hundred different ones available for you to choose from.

And, finally, if you ever want some more details on a survey you’ve been asked to take part in you can learn more about this in the “Are you in a Survey?” section.

Using the Newsroom and About Us Sections on Census.gov

The final two tabs on the website are pretty self-explanatory. Within the newsroom section, you’ll find the latest releases and blog/social media posts. You can also get facts for your features, stats for your stories, and press kits here. And if you want to know more about Census.gov, how it operates, who’s behind it, and what their research involves, head to “About Us.”

Getting the Most Out of Census.gov QuickFacts

The QuickFacts tool provided by Census.gov is incredibly useful if you want to refine the data on offer. To access the tool you can either click through from the homepage or go to the “Data” tab before clicking on “Data Tools & Apps” and “QuickFacts.”

Once the QuickFacts screen has loaded up you’ll see a search box where you can enter the state, county, city, town, or zip code – and a drop-down box that allows you to select a fact.

The facts include various factors within several sections:

  • Population
  • Age and Sex
  • Race and Hispanic Origin
  • Population Characteristics
  • Housing
  • Family and Living Arrangements
  • Education
  • Health
  • Economy
  • Transportation
  • Income & Poverty
  • Business
  • Geography

To access the data, simply enter the area you want to look in. The search bar at the top does also give you the option to choose the factor you want to filter by. For example, you may want to look at Oklahoma to see how many people are living in each household. To do this, you’ll type in “Oklahoma” in the search bar before selecting “persons per household” under the “Family and Living Arrangements” section. However, unfortunately, the tool doesn’t filter out all of the other information when you do this, so you’ll still see all the other data among the data you’ve asked for.

Therefore, to get the information you’re looking for your best off entering the area in the search bar, letting the graph load and selecting the section that’s relevant to you from the drop-down menu that’s located at the top of the table. This automatically shows “All Topics” but if you click on it, it’ll display the sections detailed in the bullet points listed above. So, for the previous example we’ve given, we’d select “Family and Living Arrangements” before narrowing down our search to see how many people were living in each household.

You’ll also notice that when your table’s generated, it will show the “United States” and your chosen area, e.g. Oklahoma. This allows you to compare the stats for both, or, if you want to focus solely on the area you’ve chosen, you can click the X above ‘United States’ to get rid of this.

Once you’ve created this table you can then add other areas to it to start comparing. All you need to do is type in the new area in the search box. For example, we might compare the number of people in a household in Oklahoma with the figures for Tennessee. After we’ve typed “Tennessee” into the search bar this will be added to the table next to Oklahoma so we can compare the two. And if you want to get rid of one of your search results, all you need to do is hit the X above the area name.

Because QuickFacts continues to add new areas to the table when you type them in the search bar, you will need to clear your existing table if you want to start a fresh comparison. To do this, just click on the “Clear” icon on the toolbar.

Using the Other Features of QuickFacts

You’ll also notice that, on this toolbar, there are a number of other icons, and these are designed to create interactive features for your searches. For example, after you’ve selected the area you’re looking at, you can click on “Map” to load a full map of the United States. It will highlight the area you’ve selected in red while also showing you all the other states. By hovering over the states you can see the total populations within each. Or, if you select a particular fact from the drop-down menu, it’ll display the total number of people within each area according to the fact you’ve selected.

The chart icon also provides you with another way of comparing your newfound stats with other states in the U.S. To use, just click on the icon after you’ve input the area and fact you want to search by.

And now comes the clever part! The “Dashboard” icon draws all three of the above features into one manageable place, so you can see the table, map, and chart at once. This offers a much more visual experience that you can continue to change and refine according to the topics you’re selecting.

If you do get confused as to what topic you’ve chosen, this is always displayed above the feature you’re using.

Finally, when you’ve found the data you want, you can start to use it by clicking on the “More” button at the end of the QuickFacts toolbar. Here you can choose to print your results, import them into a CSV file (for use with Excel spreadsheets, for example), email them to someone, get an embedded link for your website, or share them on Facebook and/or Twitter.

Although the QuickFacts feature can be a little frustrating to use to start with, by playing around with it for a few minutes you should grasp the concept of it. And once you do, the information that’s available and the features you can use are incredibly useful.

Other Useful Features on Census.gov

U.S. and World Population Clock

To see how rapidly the world’s or America’s population is expanding, the interactive Population Clock is well worth a visit. With a clock counting the population as it grows and some other timers for births, deaths, and migrations, this is a great visual tool.

Here you’ll also find out how the population is changing, being able to see how frequently a new baby’s being born, how often there’s a death, and how the population is growing by region. You can also view the population density by age and sex, viewing how it’s changed over the years.

Additionally, you can find out how large the population of America was on a certain date by entering it into the calendar. This is also available to download and share.

American FactFinder

This tool on Census.gov lets you explore popular facts about your community, while also showing you the data that’s being frequently requested about this area. To find out more all you need to do is put your state, county, city, town, or zip code in the search bar and click “Go.”

Once you’ve done this it’ll take you to a page which shows you the total population and popular tables for this area. On the left-hand side, you’ll also see a number of categories, including age, education, and housing. Clicking on one of these will bring up the relevant data for this category while, again, showing you the popular tables for this section.

However, if you want to refine your search you may find the “Guided Search” option, which is available on the main page of the American FactFinder, helpful. Here you choose from a number of options, including what information you’re looking for, the topics you’re interested in, the location you want, and whether you want to refine your data to a race or ethnic group.

Once you’ve done this you’ll be presented with a list of tables and documents that are relevant to your requirements. This is a much easier way to refine your search!

There’s also an “Advanced Search” option that allows you to search by topics, geographies, race and ethnic groups, industry codes, and EEO occupation codes. You can also search by topic or table name or the area you’re interested in.

Frequently Asked Questions

Within this section, you’ll see what questions people are asking, with popular FAQs displayed on the main page. You can refine the results by topics or find what you’re looking for straight away, just type your question in the search box.

There’s some great information available that will help shed light on your research, the data available, and what goes into the surveys. You can also dip into the glossary for help with any unknown terms.

Conclusion

As you can see there’s plenty on offer at Census.gov, whether you’re looking for the latest mobile apps or you need to produce a table of facts for a new assignment. And, although the plethora of information can seem quite intimidating at first, the above explanation of how to access all of the key areas should hopefully help you find what you’re looking for!

INFOGRAPHIC: The Lies We Tell on Resumes

resume lies

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Did Jimmy Kimmel Steal our Map?

We’ve been huge fans of Jimmy Kimmel since the days of “The Man Show” and “Win Ben Stein’s Money”.  So we were a bit shocked when we saw the 3 minute bit Jimmy ran:

 

Notice that map? That’s our map:

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Hey Jimmy – What Happened to our Logo?

This isn’t the first time Jimmy has been accused of stealing jokes. Last month, Jimmy allegedly stole a whole bunch of jokes from Tina Fey and Amy Poehler at the Oscars. Judah Friedlander also accused Kimmel of stealing a joke.

So I guess we’re not surprised – just saddened. Jimmy literally took the extra effort and completely got rid of our logo or any mention of us.

Since this isn’t the first, second, or even third time, we made a little rap sheet for Jimmy.

Check it out:

 

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We’re not like Jimmy either – that beautiful, royalty free image was taken by Romina Espinosa. Romina, whoever and wherever you are, we’d love to hear the story behind that picture!

Finally – Jimmy and team: Our lawyer says we have a pretty good case. We’re still thinking about it. But we’ll let bygones be bygones if you and Guillermo  sing I’m Sorry, So Sorry  to the BackgroundChecks.org team. No need to ask us – just go ahead, do it, and upload to your YouTube channel.

 

 

 

Genealogy: The Complete Resource Guide

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Introduction

The maxim “know thyself” was well known among the ancient Greeks and to this day people still recite those wise words – especially when searching online for “how-to-genealogy.” Casually known as one’s family history or tree, genealogy is the study of family lineages and defined by the Society of Genealogists as the “…establishment of a Pedigree by extracting evidence, from valid sources, of how one generation is connected to the next.” In addition to helping individuals figure out their roots, genealogy can also offer a more-detailed view of their family’s role in the grand scheme of history.

While many people are motivated by the possibility of discovering that their relatives may have been wealthy or famous, it can be illuminating to learn about one’s own heritage and rewarding to pass that knowledge down to future generations. Genealogical information can bring families closer together, offer a new perspective, and guide future decisions. Best of all, it allows one to… know thyself.

The Practical Importance of Genealogy

Genealogy offers a wealth of information and sometimes its findings have a significant impact on people’s lives. Throughout history, kinship and descent often demonstrated legitimate claims to power and wealth. Although not many people these days have an official claim to an iron throne, there are still several reasons why outlining a family tree can lead to big life changes.

Medical History

It’s no secret that many health conditions and ailments are hereditary, meaning that they were transmitted at birth from one’s parents. For those who have been or could have been passed down a hereditary medical condition, preventative measures can lead to much-improved health. This is where genealogy can be a literal life saver. Studying family health history can identify the necessary steps to avoid harm. For example, someone with a family history of skin cancer can take preventative measures like staying out of the sun and loading up on the sunblock. Additionally, doctors use family medical history to determine the type and frequency of screening tests, make recommendations for lifestyle changes, assess risk, and identify other related conditions. In order to create and track a family health history, individuals can use My Family Health Portrait, a tool provided by the U.S. Surgeon General.

Legal Reasons

Being able to prove that you’re related to someone can also have significant ramifications in regards to taxation, land ownership, estate administration, and forms of inheritance. Additionally, when conducting family history research, there are many genealogy-related terms that may pop up on legal documents. For example, a “dower” is the share of a husband’s real estate to which the widow is entitled upon his death and a “relict” is the widow of a deceased individual. Navigating the legal landscape can be difficult without the help of a professional, but there are resources out there that can aid the amateur genealogist. One is the FamilySearch Genealogical Dictionary of Legal Terms and another is the paperback book Genealogy and the Law.

Proof of Lineage

There are various reasons for why family ties are severed over time, but fortunately, there are numerous resources available to individuals looking to retrace family connections. This may apply to the adopted who are looking to find their birth parents or mothers looking to find their children given up for adoption. Alternately, genealogical resources can be used to determine the biological father of a child.  

History of Genealogy

As mentioned earlier, throughout most of history, kinship and descent were often the impetus for maintaining genealogical records. Their primary role was to demonstrate legitimate claims to power and wealth, while heraldry was also used to track the ancestry of royalty through armorial bearings. In the United States, several organizations emerged in the 1800s that began to gather genealogical records, including the New England Historic Genealogical Society and the Genealogical Society of Utah, which later became the Family History Department of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints – and they eventually launched FamilySearch. Today, especially after the spread of the Internet, interest in genealogy has expanded largely due to access to resources, which range from websites to societies.

Getting Started

While all this talk of legal terms and genealogical societies may seem intimidating, one of the most efficient ways to research family history is to simply talk to relatives. Don’t be afraid to put pen to paper and start sketching out a family tree, because grandparents can offer a wealth of information. The key is to start at the present and work backwards. Relatives can offer invaluable leads that will fill in the blanks and save time. To keep track of collected material, you can employ a pedigree chart, such as this free one offered by Progeny. Or you can print out a family group sheet. Once you’ve collected all the information available and have your leads, you can begin the hunt for official records.

Types of Records

There are dozens of different types of records that can be obtained to shine a light on one’s ancestry, though the process can often be time-consuming. In order to properly organize a search, it’s important to figure out what type of information you’re looking for and where to access the related records. Relevant records may include—but are not limited to—the following:

  • Medical
  • Criminal
  • Birth and death
  • Immigration
  • Census
  • Marriage and divorce
  • Wills
  • Obituaries
  • Religious, such as Baptism or Bar/Bat Mitzvah
  • Military
  • Social security
  • Tax
  • Cemetery and tombstones
  • Voter registration

Reliability of Sources

When dealing with decades-old paperwork and online searches, it can be difficult to determine which sources are accurate. Fortunately, there are steps that can be taken to help ensure information is authentic.

  • To start, begin research with your family (as mentioned above). Chances are much higher that your relatives have collected documents, photos, and memorabilia that pertains to your family tree.
  • Next, search for original sources. These are defined as the first recording of a document or event and can include facsimile microforms, photographs, unaltered digital reproductions, and the like.
  • Finally, derivative sources can also offer information but do not include original recordings. Derivative sources can include transcripts and indexes, as well as compiled records like local histories, books, and websites—all of which are compiled by a third party.

Tools for Your Search

There are many different sources for obtaining genealogical records and it’s important to cast a wide net in order to get the best results. Here are some ways for you to start your search.  

Local Library

Some libraries have entire departments or buildings dedicated to genealogical records. With the aid of a short list of names or a family tree outline, reference cards can get you the leads you need. Reference cards are often organized in a few different ways: by surname, geographical region, historical event, historical society, or local departments like the police or political office. Assuming your last name isn’t one of the most common, searching the surname will hopefully give you a handful of solid clues, possibly directing you to books, newspapers on microfilm, etc. Even a simple obituary can help fill in the blanks by sharing birth date and location, when or where a person moved, who they married, maiden name and marriage date, and the names of children and their locations.

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Ships’ logs may also be available. Most ships back in the 1600s and 1700s kept ship logs that with information about who was on the ship, where they went, and sometimes even what trade they were in and who they were traveling with. Local census records might help you find potential relatives, but won’t likely offer too much information. Some might provide townships or addresses, while others will simply list first and last names. Additionally, many libraries keep yearbooks tracing back to the 1970s, and some much further back than that. If you have a library with a thorough section, you might even find school records and photos from the 1800s.

Online Resources

The Olive Tree

The Olive Tree has links to many resources, including aforementioned ships’ passenger lists and census records. If you know that a family came over from a specific country, you can find a book of emigrants that lists anyone who left a country and it will often tell you the date and where they went. Some countries also have logs of immigrants that include when they arrived and where they came from.

National Archives and Records Administration

A great resource for U.S. residents is the National Archives and Records Administration, which is a federally-funded collection of public records. It is easy to use, though most searches point you to external links that source from various places on the Internet.

Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com is one of the most well-known names in genealogy. It is a subscription-based service with a three-tiered quality option. It also offers an additional DNA Analysis service for a charge. Once you’re a member of Ancestry, you can link up with other subscribers in your family and share information with each other. The more you network, the more you can find.

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MyHeritage.com

MyHeritage.com is very similar to Ancestry.com and it offers an intuitive design that lets you build your family tree while suggesting possible matches along the way. However, it is also a paid service and it does not offer monthly payment plans. All plans are billed annually and a free trial is unavailable, so make sure you’re ready to make the commitment. The site also analyzes the data in your family tree and can show countries of origin on a map with clickable links to profiles. MyHeritage also offers a DNA collection kits and crunches data to show you things like which months were the most popular to be born in your family or the average life expectancy.

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Genealogy.com

Genealogy.com maintains a forum for people to connect, as well as searchable read-only versions of old articles. The family-tree maker service seems to have a few bugs but has clickable links to help guide you through connections others have made. Though it is not at its prime, the website does offer a great deal of information.

FamilySearch.org

One of the best free resources available is FamilySearch.org, still maintained by the Church of Latter-day Saints. It has a fully functional search that can very quickly pull up census records, ship logs, etc. By simply searching for a known relative, one might be able to pull up their family relationships as well as a photo of the census they are listed on.

Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America is another great online resource. This website offers all sorts of wonderful materials that have been digitized and placed online. A brief overview of this resource is included in this video

If you’re not finding the records you were hoping for on other sites then you might want to consider World Vital Records. It is a subscription-based aggregation of 4.2 billion names that’s also a sub-company of MyHeritage.

Surname Index

Another potential resource is the Surname Index, a resource for anyone who might want to know the history of their surname. It is free and a not-for-profit operation, but it is not the most extensive resource. Because it began with its roots in Ireland, most of the entries stem from Irish surnames.

Find A Grave

Though it may sound morbid, a graveyard can also be a great resource for information. Generally speaking, families are buried nearby each other, some of whom are even listed on the same headstone. Photos and recorded details of grave sites across the country are compiled in the Find A Grave index. Each entry has a photo of the headstone along with any information on it.

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Of course, Google can be a very useful tool for research. To learn more about how to use it, check out this video:

Genealogical Societies

Local historical and genealogical societies bring people together to collect and reconstruct their histories. Societies are generally formed out of necessity by a group of people who have a certain trait in common, be that a historical event or country of origin. Sometimes societies require an application and dues to join, other times they are rather informal, but most are not-for-profit or charity-based. A well-known society is Daughters of the American Revolution, which has collected and pieced together an impressive amount of historical information. Additionally, the National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, and American Society of Genealogists are three of the major players and would all be great places to start. The larger and more prominent societies tend to offer things like conferences, educational courses, publications, and even special access to online genealogical databases.

Professional Genealogists

When you’ve exhausted your options, or perhaps just your patience, you might consider hiring a professional to help you continue your search. It may sound expensive, but most professional services use individual agreements between the historian and the person hiring them to agree on the terms of their search and the price. If you want to see what you can get for $500, there’s an option for that. Otherwise, sparing no expense to find out about a specific lineage has an option too.

Generally speaking, a genealogist will begin by interviewing family members and scouring historical records. Because they’ve done this for many years they understand how circumstantial evidence for kinship can be found and verified. They can easily turn to and cite sources so they can easily go back if necessary. It would be impossible for any one person to be an expert at the entire field of genealogy so many professionals focus on a specific lineage or region. If you know that your family has lived in one area for quite a while then it would be prudent to hire someone who is local to and specializes in that area. Keep in mind, however, that there is no standard of certification or licensing required for one to claim to be a genealogist. Check out these organizations for leads:

Heritage Consulting

Heritage Consulting specializes in genealogy story creation. Instead of hiring a genealogist specifically they work as a team to exact the details of your past and give you a comprehensive report. The price is per hour and the number of hours needed varies wildly between families.

American Ancestors

American Ancestors began as a project by the New England Historic Genealogical Society. They offer collaborative reports or create lineage mappings. However, at $105 per hour, services aren’t cheap.

Association of Professional Genealogists

The Association of Professional Genealogists is probably the best place to look for a genealogist. It is, essentially, a comprehensive list of genealogists with a biography on each, including the work they’ve done, professional certifications, and even testimonials from clients.

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DNA Testing

Most of the major subscription-based genealogy sites offer DNA testing that could potentially help people decode their pasts, but they come with mixed reviews. When testing DNA, a vial of your saliva is used to isolate your DNA and map out over 700,000 genetic markers. There are a few different types of ways to test DNA; autosomal or X-DNA, Y-DNA, and mtDNA. Each tracks a different part of the DNA and can lead to different discoveries. Check out the following DNA-testing services:

Quick Links

Search Resources

Societies

Find a Professional

DNA Services

Videos

Which States have the Worst DUI Problems?

Spring is in the air. That means parties, barbecues, and of course, a lot more beer and drinking. While there’s nothing wrong with drinking, Drinking and Driving is still a major problem across the United States. We set out to see how bad it really is. Check out the map, then scroll below for our data!
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Concerned about safety issues in your community? Check out our home security resources for more information.

DUIs are going up in America. Over 10,000 people were killed  and more then 200,000 were inured in 2015  alone as a direct result of someone driving under the influence. We set out to figure out how bad drunk driving is in America, and the results are bad. To create a ranking of states, we took a combination of deaths directly attributable to DUIs, DUI arrests per 100,000 people, and drinking too much before driving, as reported by drivers themselves.  We then created a weighted formula. The results are below – let us know how your state did and what you think in the comments!

(Our data came from the CDC, and MADD, which aggregates state data).

The States with the Worst DUI Problems

Ranking, Worst to BestStateNo. of fatalitiesRate (of all total traffic deaths)Increase/Decrease from last yearDUI death rate (per 100,000)DUI arrestsDUI Arrest Rate (per 100,000)Percentage of Adults Who Reported Drinking Too Much Before Driving, 2014
1Wyoming560.38%16.7% increase9.563,1575391.4
2North Dakota500.38%9.1% decrease6.606,3518383.4
3South Dakota430.33%2.3% decrease4.977,3058442.2
4Montana750.34%2.7% increase7.193,6743522.4
5South Carolina3010.31%9.1% decrease6.0716,2723281.6
6Mississippi1750.26%1.7% increase5.866,8892301.6
7New Mexico980.33%16.2% decrease4.718,5424101.1
8Kentucky1920.25%12.3% increase4.3317,8254021.4
9Maine520.33%40.5% increase3.915,7564321.7
10Arkansas1490.28%9.6% increase4.996,9192321.4
11Idaho700.32%32.1% increase4.165,8443471.6
12Texas13230.38%8.5% decrease4.7564,9712331.8
13Louisiana2450.34%8% decrease5.235,3391142.2
14Wisconsin1890.33%14.5% increase3.2724,5884252.2
15North Carolina4110.30%13.2% increase4.0535,9673541.2
16Alabama2470.29%6.8% decrease5.087,8631621.3
17Arizona2720.31%36% increase3.9222,3673231.6
18Oklahoma1700.27%9% increase4.3311,1012830.9
19Tennessee2520.26%7.7% decrease3.7923,1503481.1
20Alaska230.36%4.5% increase3.103,1634261.6
21Colorado1510.28%5.6% decrease2.7325,5624611.9
22Missouri2240.26%9.3% increase3.6819,4493191.3
23Nebraska650.26%8.3% increase3.415,3482802.5
24Oregon1550.35%56.5% increase3.799,0192201.6
25Nevada970.30%4.3% increase3.307,6122592.2
26Pennsylvania3640.30%4.3% increase2.8544,6153491.8
27West Virginia710.27%15.5% decrease3.884,5432480.5
28Florida7970.27%14.8% increase3.8731,7831541.7
29Hawaii330.35%10% increase2.315,2503682.1
30Iowa780.24%14.3% decrease2.499,0282882.8
31Ohio3130.28%3.6% increase2.6934,2542952
32California9140.29%4.3% increase2.33141,4583601.9
33Delaware410.33%21.2% decrease4.31386411.7
34Michigan2670.28%25.9% increase2.6926,8452702.2
35Vermont150.27%87.5% increase2.402,1443431.8
36New Hampshire330.29%13.8% increase2.474,7463561.3
37Minnesota1150.28%6.5% increase2.0820,8303771.9
38Maryland1590.31%22.3% increase2.6417,1002841.8
39Connecticut1030.39%6.2% increase2.888,1482281.9
40Georgia3660.26%31.2% increase3.5519,2171860.7
41Kansas840.24%22.2% decrease2.897,1862471.4
42Washington1480.26%12.1% increase2.0324,6273381.9
43Indiana1780.22%11.3% increase2.6814,4282181.6
44Virginia2080.28%3.7% decrease2.4720,4772431.5
45Rhode Island190.43%11.8% increase1.802,5912452.5
46Utah430.16%24.6% decrease1.418,8132890.8
47New Jersey1110.20%31.1% decrease1.2422,2012481.4
48Illinois3070.31%1.7% increase2.403,659291.8
49Massachusetts960.31%32.9% decrease1.418,2581212
50New York3110.28%0.3% decrease1.5828,9881471

 

 

 

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