Cities with the Most Female Business Owners

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Small businesses are a major engine of growth in the U.S. economy, and women are playing an increasingly large role in the country’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. According to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, women-owned firms now represent more than one in five businesses with employees in the U.S., a figure that has trended upward in recent years. These enterprises  report over $1.8 trillion in annual revenue and employ nearly 11 million workers.

While women-owned businesses are becoming a more significant part of the economy, the Census Bureau’s data also shows that women’s experiences of entrepreneurship frequently look different than men’s. Notably, the industries that women tend to start businesses in are different from the most common industries for men. In particular, fields like health care and social assistance or accommodation and food service tend to have higher proportions of women-owned businesses. And in part due to these differences in industry, women-owned firms tend to pay less per employee (-30.1%) than the national average.

However, these differences also extend to women’s reasons for getting into business in the first place. Women are more likely than men to report that flexible hours or balancing work and family obligations were very important when deciding to start a business. Meanwhile, men are more likely to say that the possibility of earning greater income or wanting to be their own boss motivated their decision to start a business.

It is most common for both female and male business owners to still be with their first business, but more female business owners (55%) are involved with their first business than their male counterparts (47.5%). In contrast, men are more likely to have moved on from a previous business in some form. Men more frequently respond that they still operate a previous business, that their business was sold to another company or individual, or that a previous business is no longer in operation.

Women-owned businesses are also distributed unevenly across the U.S. Hawaii stands out as having the highest share of women-owned businesses at 24.5%, with Virginia (23.9%) and Colorado (23.8%) not far behind. At the other end of the spectrum, many of the states with the lowest share of female-owned businesses are found in the central U.S., including South Dakota (13.6%), North Dakota (14.2%), and Iowa (15.9%). At the metro level, many of the top states are well-represented, with locations like Honolulu, Denver, and the Washington, D.C. metro having especially high concentrations of female enterprises.


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The data used in this analysis is from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Business Survey. To determine the locations with most female business owners, researchers at BackgroundChecks.org calculated the percentage of businesses that are women-owned. In the event of a tie, the location with a greater total businesses that are women-owned was ranked higher. Only the 100 largest metropolitan areas for which complete data was available were considered in this analysis. All data shown represents employer firms only; firms without employees are not included.

Here are the U.S. metros with the most female business owners.

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15. Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 22.3%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 11,456
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 110,780
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

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14. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 22.4%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 8,375
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 70,423
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

13. San Francisco-Oakland-Berkeley, CA

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 22.5%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 23,777
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 177,572
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

12. Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 22.7%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 25,167
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 238,105
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

11. Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Alpharetta, GA

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 22.8%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 25,815
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 196,911
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

10. Richmond, VA

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.0%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 5,898
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 46,459
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

9. Jacksonville, FL

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.0%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 6,805
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 50,424
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

8. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.0%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 39,597
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 213,294
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

7. Durham-Chapel Hill, NC

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.4%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 2,458
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 14,403
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $1 billion to less than $5 billion

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

6. New Orleans-Metairie, LA

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.7%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 5,808
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 72,267
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

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5. Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.7%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 6,336
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 47,970
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

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4. Albuquerque, NM

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 23.8%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 3,583
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 29,324
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $1 billion to less than $5 billion

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

3. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 24.0%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 26,857
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 255,460
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more


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2. Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 24.4%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 17,045
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 131,685
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

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1. Urban Honolulu, HI

  • Percentage of businesses that are women-owned: 26.1%
  • Total businesses that are women-owned: 4,304
  • Total employment at women-owned businesses: 44,130
  • Total revenue at women-owned businesses: $5 billion or more

Detailed Findings & Methodology

The data used in this analysis is from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Business Survey. To determine the locations with most female business owners, researchers calculated the percentage of businesses that are women-owned. In the event of a tie, the location with a greater total businesses that are women-owned was ranked higher. Only the 100 largest metropolitan areas for which complete data was available were considered in this analysis. All data shown represents employer firms only; firms without employees are not included.

Cities With the Largest Immigrant Populations

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With a foreign-born population of more than 44 million, the U.S. has the largest number of immigrants in the world. In fact, research from the Pew Research Center shows that the U.S. immigrant population accounts for one-fifth of the world’s migrants. While U.S. immigrants come from almost every country in the world, Mexico is the most common country of origin for the foreign-born population.

From the period of 1850 to 2020, when the most recent data is available, the foreign-born population share hit a high of 14.8% in 1900. From 1920 to 1980, the share of immigrants fell, dropping to a low of 4.7% in 1980. Until recently, the immigrant share of the population had been climbing and was at a near historic high in 2019 before the pandemic. The share of immigrants dropped slightly in 2020 to 13.5%, down from the 13.7% it had stood at for the last several years.

Accounting for 24.8% of the foreign-born population, Mexico claims the largest number of U.S. immigrants. The Chinese and Indian immigrant populations are also large, making up a collective 12.2% of the foreign-born population. Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data shows that about one million immigrants arrive in the U.S. each year, and the most common region for new immigrants is now Asia, which recently surpassed Hispanic countries.


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While immigrants live in every U.S. state, some parts of the country have larger foreign-born populations than others. Over one-fourth of California’s population is foreign-born—mostly coming from Mexico—making California the top state for immigrants. New Jersey and New York also have large immigrant populations, with 22.7% and 22.4% of their populations being immigrants, respectively. Alternatively, Montana and West Virginia have very small immigrant populations, accounting for just 2.2% and 1.6% of their populations, respectively.

To determine the U.S. metropolitan areas with the largest immigrant populations, researchers at BackgroundChecks.org analyzed the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The researchers ranked metros according to the foreign-born population share. Researchers also calculated the most common country of origin, the total foreign-born population, and the total population.

To improve relevance, only metropolitan areas with at least 100,000 people were included in the analysis. Additionally, metro areas were grouped into the following cohorts based on population size: 

  • Small metros: 100,000–349,999
  • Midsize metros: 350,000–999,999
  • Large metros: more than 1,000,000

Here are the metros with the largest immigrant populations.

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15. Sacramento-Roseville-Folsom, CA

  • Foreign-born population share: 18.5%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 432,837
  • Total population: 2,338,866

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14. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX

  • Foreign-born population share: 18.5%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 1,376,117
  • Total population: 7,451,858

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13. Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL

  • Foreign-born population share: 18.8%
  • Most common country of origin: Colombia
  • Total foreign-born population: 481,158
  • Total population: 2,560,260

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12. Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH

  • Foreign-born population share: 18.9%
  • Most common country of origin: China
  • Total foreign-born population: 918,197
  • Total population: 4,854,808

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11. Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA

  • Foreign-born population share: 19.2%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 754,455
  • Total population: 3,928,498

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10. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA

  • Foreign-born population share: 21.1%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 970,476
  • Total population: 4,600,396

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9. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV

  • Foreign-born population share: 22.1%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 492,617
  • Total population: 2,228,866

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8. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

  • Foreign-born population share: 22.8%
  • Most common country of origin: El Salvador
  • Total foreign-born population: 1,425,904
  • Total population: 6,250,309

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7. San Diego-Chula Vista-Carlsbad, CA

  • Foreign-born population share: 22.9%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 762,260
  • Total population: 3,323,970

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6. Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX

  • Foreign-born population share: 23.3%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 1,623,239
  • Total population: 6,979,613

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5. New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA

  • Foreign-born population share: 29.3%
  • Most common country of origin: Dominican Republic
  • Total foreign-born population: 5,652,129
  • Total population: 19,261,570

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4. San Francisco-Oakland-Berkeley, CA

  • Foreign-born population share: 30.7%
  • Most common country of origin: China
  • Total foreign-born population: 1,443,907
  • Total population: 4,709,220


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3. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA

  • Foreign-born population share: 32.7%
  • Most common country of origin: Mexico
  • Total foreign-born population: 4,325,660
  • Total population: 13,211,027

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2. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA

  • Foreign-born population share: 39.1%
  • Most common country of origin: China
  • Total foreign-born population: 775,944
  • Total population: 1,985,926

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1. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL

  • Foreign-born population share: 40.9%
  • Most common country of origin: Cuba
  • Total foreign-born population: 2,504,666
  • Total population: 6,129,858

Detailed Findings & Methodology

To determine the U.S. metropolitan areas with the largest immigrant populations, researchers at BackgroundChecks.org analyzed the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2020 American Community Survey. The researchers ranked metros according to the foreign-born population share. In the event of a tie, the metro with the higher number of immigrants was ranked higher. Researchers also calculated the most common country of origin, the total foreign-born population, and the total population.

To improve relevance, only metropolitan areas with at least 100,000 people were included in the analysis. Additionally, metro areas were grouped into the following cohorts based on population size: 

  • Small metros: 100,000–349,999
  • Midsize metros: 350,000–999,999
  • Large metros: more than 1,000,000

U.S. Counties With the Most Gun Deaths

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Over the past few years, the U.S. has seen sharply increasing levels of violent crime. After two decades of decreases beginning in the mid-1990s, incidents have begun to rise again. Within the last two years, the trend has become especially pronounced. FBI data recently showed a 5.6% increase in violent crime from 2019 to 2020, even as rates of property crime continued to decline. In the same year, the murder rate rose by around 30%, one of the largest year-over-year increases on record.

Guns are closely tied to this trend in the U.S. The U.S. has the highest rate of civilian gun ownership of any country, and researchers have found the prevalence of guns to be associated with greater amounts of violent crime and gun deaths generally. Given these dynamics, it is unsurprising to see that gun-related deaths have spiked in recent years during the broader increase in violent crime.

Recent data from the CDC reveals how this trend has played out. In 2014, there were only 3.5 gun-related homicides per 100,000 population. By 2016, that figure increased to 4.6, and in 2020, it jumped to 6.2. Separately, gun-related suicides have also increased in recent years—from a low of 5.5 per 100,000 population in 2006 to 7.0 in 2020—but this increase has been more gradual.


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In total, 45,221 deaths in 2020 were gun-related, which is a 14% increase over the prior year and a 43% increase over a decade before. These gun-related deaths constitute a majority of both homicides and suicides. Over the past three years, more than three in four U.S. homicides (76.4%) involved a gun, while more than half of suicides (51.2%) were gun-related.

While the overall growth of gun-related deaths is a nationwide issue, some locations are more affected than others. Many of the states with the highest rates of gun-related deaths are states that also have the highest rates of gun ownership. These states include locations in the South and Mountain West, along with Alaska. Mississippi leads the nation in gun-related fatalities per 100,000 residents at 28.6, followed by neighboring Louisiana at 26.3 and Wyoming at 25.9. At the other end of the spectrum, Hawaii has the lowest rate of gun-related fatalities at 3.4 per 100,000 residents, followed by a group of Northeastern states including Massachusetts (3.7) and New Jersey (5.0). However, gun ownership is not a perfect predictor of gun deaths: for example, states like New Hampshire and Maine have relatively high levels of gun prevalence, but are also in the bottom 10 states for gun deaths per capita.

Gun-related deaths are also unevenly distributed at the local level. While some of the Southern and Western states with higher levels of gun fatalities do have counties with similarly high levels of gun deaths, many of the top counties are found in Rust Belt locations like Philadelphia, Indianapolis, and Detroit. These more economically distressed locations may have greater levels of gun violence due to the relationship between factors like social mobility and income inequality and gun deaths.

The data used in this analysis is from the CDC’s WONDER Database. To identify the locations with the most gun deaths, researchers at BackgroundChecks.org calculated the rates of gun-related death per 100,000 residents in 2020. In the event of a tie, the location with the greater total number of gun-related deaths in 2020 was ranked higher. To provide additional context, researchers also calculated the proportion of all homicides and suicides that involve a gun, using data from 2018–2020.

Here are the counties with the most gun deaths.

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15. DeKalb County, GA

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 19.0
  • Total gun-related deaths: 145
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: -15.2%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 87.1%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 57.3%

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14. Hamilton County, OH

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 19.4
  • Total gun-related deaths: 159
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +23.3%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 85.9%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 51.6%

Photo Credit: RCole3 / Shutterstock

13. Pima County, AZ

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 19.5
  • Total gun-related deaths: 207
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +1.5%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 69.4%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 60.7%

Photo Credit: Jonathan Siegel / Shutterstock

12. Cook County, IL

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 20.4
  • Total gun-related deaths: 1,040
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +45.7%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 87.2%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 33.5%

Photo Credit: Luciano Mortula - LGM / Shutterstock

11. Fulton County, GA

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 21.4
  • Total gun-related deaths: 231
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +29.1%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 83.1%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 51.1%

Photo Credit: Nick Fox / Shutterstock

10. Oklahoma County, OK

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 23.1
  • Total gun-related deaths: 186
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +0.5%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 79.0%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 58.2%

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9. Cuyahoga County, OH

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 24.3
  • Total gun-related deaths: 298
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +29.6%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 82.1%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 48.6%

Photo Credit: Paul Brady Photography / Shutterstock

8. Milwaukee County, WI

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 25.6
  • Total gun-related deaths: 242
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +69.2%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 82.3%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 42.3%

Photo Credit: CHARLES MORRA / Shutterstock

7. Duval County, FL

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 25.6
  • Total gun-related deaths: 247
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +14.4%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 83.1%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 56.6%

Photo Credit: Sergey Novikov / Shutterstock

6. Wayne County, MI

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 26.3
  • Total gun-related deaths: 458
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +30.9%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 86.2%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 51.8%

Photo Credit: Rudy Balasko / Shutterstock

5. St. Louis County, MO

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 26.4
  • Total gun-related deaths: 262
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +15.9%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 90.8%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 51.9%

Photo Credit: Jonny Trego / Shutterstock

4. Jefferson County, KY

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 31.0
  • Total gun-related deaths: 238
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +65.3%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 89.2%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 53.0%

Photo Credit: Rudy Balasko / Shutterstock

3. Marion County, IN

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 32.8
  • Total gun-related deaths: 317
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +46.1%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 85.2%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 58.0%

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2. Philadelphia County, PA

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 34.1
  • Total gun-related deaths: 538
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +46.6%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 86.8%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 38.1%

Photo Credit: The Speedy Butterfly / Shutterstock

1. Shelby County, TN

  • Total gun-related deaths per 100k: 40.6
  • Total gun-related deaths: 380
  • Change in gun-related deaths since 2019: +36.7%
  • Gun-related homicides as a share of total homicides: 91.5%
  • Gun-related suicides as a share of total suicides: 64.0%

Methodology & Detailed Findings

The data used in this analysis is from the CDC’s WONDER Database. To identify the locations with the most gun deaths, researchers calculated the rates of gun-related death per 100,000 residents in 2020. In the event of a tie, the location with the greater total number of gun-related deaths in 2020 was ranked higher. For national- and state-level statistics, the rates shown are age-adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are not available for county-level estimates. To provide additional context, researchers also calculated the proportion of all homicides and suicides that involve a gun, using data from 2018–2020. Only counties with at least 200,000 residents in 2020 were included in the analysis. Additionally, counties were grouped into the following cohorts based on population size: small (200,000–349,999); midsize (350,000–749,999); and large (750,000 or more).

Cities With the Most Residents Who Have “Side Hustles”

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The term “side hustle” generally refers to a job on the side of a full-time job that brings in supplemental income for the worker. Side hustles often begin as a means to provide extra spending money or cover bills, but some eventually turn into full-fledged businesses. According to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly 3 million full-time workers (2.5% of total) had side hustles in 2019 and earned a median $6,800 annually from this extra work. These numbers are likely to increase amid the COVID-19 pandemic, alongside record numbers of new business applications.

Interestingly, certain privately conducted surveys show that up to a third or even as many as 45% of Americans perform work on the side. Census Bureau estimates are likely lower due to several factors pertaining to how side hustle work is defined and hesitancy among respondents to report side income on government forms. For one, the Census Bureau survey questionnaire asks respondents specifically about “self-employment income” from their “own businesses.” Less serious side hustlers or side hustlers who earn only a minimal amount of money may not view their efforts as actual businesses and thus might not report their side hustle earnings. In addition, workers may be hesitant to report under-the-table pay to a government agency for fear of being taxed. As such, the side hustle estimates calculated using Census data reflect those more legitimate business ventures that workers are willing to report to a government agency.

These factors perhaps contribute to the fact that higher-income workers are much more likely than low-wage workers to have side hustles, based on Census Bureau data. Over 5% of full-time workers earning over $100,000 per year have side hustles, twice the rate of workers earning $50,000–75,000, and more than six times the rate of workers earning less than $25,000. Having a side hustle is also correlated with educational attainment. Almost 4% of workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher have side hustles, compared with just 1.2% of high school graduates.

The prevalence of side hustler workers also varies by location across the U.S. Some of the Midwestern and Great Plains states have much larger shares of side hustlers than other parts of the country. At the state level, South Dakota (4.6%) and Nebraska (4.2%) have the largest percentage of workers with a side hustle. Workers in these two states tend to earn more from their side businesses as well, with median incomes of $7,500 and $8,000 respectively.


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To determine the metropolitan areas with the most residents who have side hustles, researchers from BackgroundChecks.org analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Metro areas were ranked by the percentage of workers with a side hustle, defined as full-time workers who have positive self-employment income that is less than their wage and salary income. Researchers also calculated the number of total workers with a side hustle, median total income for workers with a side hustle, median side hustle income, and median total income for all workers. Only the 100 largest metros in the U.S. were included in the analysis.

Here are the metros with the most residents with side hustles.

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

15. Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, TN

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.1%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 25,630

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $70,000

  • Median side hustle income: $6,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $47,700

Photo Credit: Michael Shake / Shutterstock

14. Toledo, OH

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.2%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 6,743

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $66,300

  • Median side hustle income: $6,500

  • Median total income for all workers: $45,000


DID YOU KNOW?

A reverse address lookup is the act of finding information about the current residents, former residents, or property owner of a home or business using a specific street address. 


Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

13. Boise City, ID

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.2%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 8,262

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $65,000

  • Median side hustle income: $8,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $45,000

Photo Credit: f11photo / Shutterstock

12. Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.2%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 9,359

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $66,000

  • Median side hustle income: $6,400

  • Median total income for all workers: $53,000

Photo Credit: Henryk Sadura / Shutterstock

11. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.2%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 10,800

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $68,500

  • Median side hustle income: $5,500

  • Median total income for all workers: $48,000

Photo Credit: AMB-MD Photography / Shutterstock

10. Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.2%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 45,931

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $76,000

  • Median side hustle income: $5,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $58,000

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

9. Portland-South Portland, ME

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.3%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 6,734

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $77,220

  • Median side hustle income: $5,900

  • Median total income for all workers: $50,000

Photo Credit: Bob Pool / Shutterstock

8. Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.3%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 30,594

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $85,000

  • Median side hustle income: $5,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $55,000

Photo Credit: Roschetzky Photography / Shutterstock

7. Austin-Round Rock, TX

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.3%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 30,970

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $76,000

  • Median side hustle income: $5,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $51,000

Photo Credit: Roschetzky Photography / Shutterstock

6. Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.4%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 42,915

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $84,000

  • Median side hustle income: $6,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $59,000

Photo Credit: arburkholder / Shutterstock

5. Lancaster, PA

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.6%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 6,872

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $52,000

  • Median side hustle income: $4,600

  • Median total income for all workers: $45,000

Photo Credit: photo.ua / Shutterstock

4. Salt Lake City, UT

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.6%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 17,598

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $72,000

  • Median side hustle income: $5,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $49,500

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

3. Raleigh, NC

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.6%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 20,123

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $72,000

  • Median side hustle income: $8,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $53,000


TRENDING

Learn what public records are and how to get access to most of the information for free or for a low cost in our detailed guide on understanding public records. Then use our public records search tool to find what you’re looking for.


Photo Credit: Wendell Guy / Shutterstock

2. Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 3.9%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 12,921

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $90,000

  • Median side hustle income: $10,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $70,000

Photo Credit: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

1. Provo-Orem, UT

  • Percentage of workers with a side hustle: 5.4%

  • Total workers with a side hustle: 9,908

  • Median total income for workers with a side hustle: $80,000

  • Median side hustle income: $9,000

  • Median total income for all workers: $50,000

Detailed Findings & Methodology

To determine the metropolitan areas with the most residents who have side hustles, researchers at BackgroundChecks analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample. Metro areas were ranked by the percentage of workers with a side hustle. In the event of a tie, the metro with the larger number of total workers with a side hustle was ranked higher. Researchers also calculated median total income for workers with a side hustle, median side hustle income, and median total income for all workers. Workers with side hustles are defined as full-time workers who have positive self-employment income that is less than their wage and salary income. Only the 100 largest metros were included in the analysis.

How Social Security Works: A Guide to Social Security Benefits

If you’ve held a 9-5 job, you’ve likely heard of social security. This federal program serves as a sort-of savings account that older Americans can tap into to provide income for their retirement. While most people associate social security with retirement benefits, it also provides disability benefits and support for family members who lose a spouse or parent. 

Statistics show about 180 million people worked and paid social security taxes and about 65 million people received monthly benefits as of June 2020. Most of the beneficiaries, about 49 million people, are current retirees, according to the Social Security Administration.

To better understand what social security benefits are, how the federal government calculates them, and what you can financially expect to get later on in life, this guide should provide answers to commonly asked questions. 

How does social security work?

When a person works, he or she pays into the social security system. Take a look at a pay stub. You’ll notice that your employer has taken out FICA taxes, that’s for social security retirement benefits. Most employees pay 6.2% of their income into social security and the employer matches that, paying another 6.2%, for a total of 14.4% of income delivered to the social security system. 

As a person works and pays into the system, credits are earned. Eligibility is based on earning credits. Usually, a person needs 40 credits, which are usually accumulated after about 10 years of work, to be eligible for social security benefits. 

Senior citizens choose when to start collecting retirement income. It can be collected at full retirement age, where a person receives full benefits or collected earlier, at age 62. If a person decides to collect early retirement at the age of 62, the income will be less than it would be if the person waited until full retirement age.

What age is considered full retirement age? It varies based on the year a person is born. The chart below explains when a person is considered full retirement age:

Year of birth

Full retirement age
1943-195466
195566 years and 2 months
195666 years and 4 months
195766 years and 6 months
195866 years and 8 months
195966 years and 10 months
1960 or later67

When a person is ready to start collecting social security, he or she must apply for the benefits about four months before the payments are expected to start. Funds are deposited directly into a bank account or placed on a prepaid debit card.

How much money can you expect from social security?

The amount of money a person gets for monthly income depends on lifetime earnings and at what age the benefits are claimed. As of June 2020, the average monthly payout was $1514, which is about $18,170 a year. While that might not seem like a lot, keep in mind that social security isn’t meant to be a person’s sole source of retirement income. It’s meant to serve as a supplement. 

Of course, knowing how much money will likely come from social security can help with retirement plans. 

The federal government has a formula to calculate retirement benefits. To start, actual earnings are adjusted or indexed to account for changes in wages since a person began working. Then, an average monthly earning is reached by looking at the 35 best-paid years. From there, a primary insurance amount is computed, which is the amount a person would earn monthly if the person waited to claim benefits at full retirement age. 

Since the math behind social security benefits is a bit complicated to grasp, the Social Security Administration has a retirement estimator tool on its website (ssa.gov) that can provide this figure easily. A “My Social Security” account must be set up first.

Before using the estimator, there are certain factors that can change a retirement benefit that retired workers should be aware of, which include:

  • The age at which social security retirement benefits are claimed alters the monthly amount.
  • Cost of living adjustments are added to benefits when a person reaches 62 and continues up to the year a person starts receiving benefits.
  • A person can delay the start of their own retirement benefits past his or her full retirement age, which can increase monthly benefits. 
  • The payout formula is different for government workers with a pension that’s not tied to social security. Government employees should use this planning tool for additional information.  

What should you know about disability benefits?

Social security benefits are also available for those with disabilities from two different programs: Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance. 

Supplemental Security Income is for elderly, blind, or disabled adults or children with little to no income or assets. Social Security Disability Insurance provides benefits for people who have worked enough to qualify for social security benefits, which is usually about 10 working years.

To learn more, check out our guide to benefits for people with disabilities

What should you know about social security survivor benefits?

Social security funds are also used to pay survivor benefits. If an earner dies, qualifying spouses, or in some cases parents, can receive benefits. To start the process, the Social Security Administration must be notified of the death and a death certificate must be submitted. 

Spousal benefits are generally available to spouses once they reach the age of 60. The amount given depends on how much money the deceased person was getting from social security or would have earned, if the person wasn’t claiming benefits yet. The amount changes based on when a spouse claims the benefit as well. Waiting until full retirement age does result in more income. 

It’s possible for people to claim both their own social security benefits and survivor benefits. If that’s the case, a person will get the larger monthly sum, not both benefits combined. A person might decide to claim their own benefits early and delay survivor benefits. 

To understand more about social security survivor benefits and what the benefit amount could be, visit the survivor benefits page on the Social Security Administration website. 

How can you apply for social security benefits?

If a person is ready to collect social security benefits, there are three ways to get the process started. A person can apply online at ssa.gov, by calling the Social Security Administration office at 1-800-325-0778, or by visiting a local social security office.

Filing online takes about 15 minutes. A person must answer a series of questions to complete an application, but the process can be completed in multiple sessions, if necessary. It’s best to apply for the benefits about four months before you’d like to receive them.  

Where does social security tax money go?

Social security is a payroll tax that’s taken out of a person’s paycheck. In 2021, $0.85 of every dollar goes to a social security trust fund that pays out social security benefits. About $0.15 of every dollar goes to a trust fund used to support people with disabilities. Less than $0.01 goes to manage the fund, according to the Social Security Administration

When did social security income start?

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law in 1935. Its original purpose was to help older Americans retire more comfortably, but was amended to include disability and survivor benefits years later.

Are social security benefits taxed?

If a person earns too much money, social security income is taxed by the U.S. government. If a person files a federal tax return as an individual with a combined income between $25,000-$34,000, the person will pay income tax on up to 50% of his or her benefits. A person making more than $34,000 will pay income tax on up to 85% of his or her benefits. 

A joint return with a combined income between $25,000-$44,000 will also pay income tax on up to 50% of the benefit sum. Anything over $44,000, the earner can expect to pay tax on up to 85% of the monthly benefit. The social security website explains more about taxed benefits.

What is delayed retirement?

Delayed retirement is when a person chooses not to claim benefits until after their full retirement age. The person earns delayed retirement credits, which can increase the monthly amount the person will receive once he or she starts collecting.

What is early retirement?

A person can start collecting social security benefits at the age of 62, which is before anyone reaches their full retirement age. If the money is collected before full retirement age, it’s considered early retirement and benefits are reduced.

Tip:  Many retirees who want to retire early utilize annuities to supplement their income and delay their Social Security Benefits until full retirement age. As a result, they have a higher monthly income amount throughout retirement.

Can you still work and receive social security benefits?

Yes. A person can work and still get social security, but there is a limit to how much can be earned. The United States government has some strict, specific rules about earning while claiming benefits, which can be found on the social security website under receiving benefits while working.

Will social security run out?

Reports show social security funds could run out by 2028. There are many reasons behind the depleting funds. For starters, the pandemic has created a high unemployment rate, which means fewer people are paying into the system. Plus, wages are down, so even people who are paying into the system are paying less. The pandemic has shaved an estimated seven years off the social security fund’s lifespan. 

In addition, more people are claiming disability and more people taking social security before they reach full retirement age, which has also left the system strapped for cash. 

There are suggested solutions, which include increasing payroll taxes, reducing everyone’s benefit amount, and raising the minimum age to collect social security. 

Considering the future of social security is unstable, it’s best to speak with an investment advisor to review your earnings record, estimate social security benefits, and plan for shortfalls.   

What resources are available to learn more about social security? 

A person can visit the Social Security Administration website at ssa.gov, call the office at 1-800-325-0778, or visit a local social security office. Typically, offices are open Monday-Friday from 7am-7pm. 

This guide, Understanding The Benefits, may also provide additional information.

Arizona Public Records

Freedom of Information Act allows the public access to documents that are maintained by governmental agencies.

The Arizona public records law includes any public organization or agency that is state-funded.

Even though there are no exemptions to Arizona public records law, other factors such as office hours make obtaining information harder than it should be.

Requests for public documents are different depending on the agency. If your public records request is rejected, you will need to resubmit it in writing.

Arizona public records include criminal records, inmate records, court records, and vital records.

What does the Arizona public records law say?

Arizona public records law states that anyone that lives within or outside the state can request public information.

However, there isn’t a specific time frame that agencies must respond to a request. The courts define the word “promptly” as quickly as possible. Failure to respond promptly is considered a denial by Arizona.

Arizona doesn’t require an appointment of a records custodian for the state or each agency. However, the law states that a government agency will maintain proper records and assist with documents for any and all requests.

Agencies can charge fees for all records, and there aren’t any fee waivers.

However, those seeking records on behalf of a government are a government division. Insurance or other types of benefits are exempted from fees.

Arizona has no formal appeals process should a request be denied. Requesters can take the agency issuing a denial to court.

For information on public access to records in the state of Arizona, visit Arizona.gov or the Arizona State Library, 

How can a person access public records in Arizona?

Some Arizona public records are available online, while others require a formal request.

If a request is necessary, it can be delivered by mail, email, or phone to the record-holding government agency.

Every department is different, so expect some variation in processes, procedures, and prices between agencies. A public records request can be done by email, mail, or phone, depending on the government agency where you need to submit the request.

In general, a public records request should include:

  • Your contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document and details of the document you are requesting
  • A date that you’d like to receive the documents
  • Method of delivery, email, or mail

Office hours differ from department to department. You should always call the office of the agency before arriving.

Arizona Criminal Records

The Arizona Department of Public Safety public criminal records include the basics of a person’s interactions with law enforcement and the courts.

It can include arrests, charges, and court action. Depending on the state, it typically doesn’t have traffic offenses and sometimes won’t include misdemeanors.

  • Date of arrest
  • Charge
  • Prosecution date
  • Guilty Pleas
  • Convictions
  • Felony or misdemeanor charge

Criminal records are often accessed by employers who want to conduct a background check on a possible hire.

Arizona criminal background checks could also be used in certain business dealings if there is a merger or partnership.

What’s on a criminal record in Arizona?

An Arizona public criminal record reflects a persona’s interactions with local police departments, courts, and the state prison system.

The information listed on a criminal record may vary between jurisdictions, but most public criminal records contain:

  • First middle and last name of the offender
  • Offense(s) committed and law violated
  • Case number
  • Physical descriptions such as race, height, eye color, hair color, tattoos, etc.
  • Date of birth
  • Pending charges
  • Acquitted or dismissed charges

Where can a person find Arizona criminal records?

The Arizona Department of Public Safety maintains criminal records and background checks.

The Criminal History Records Section is the Central State Repository for Arizona’s criminal records. All law enforcement agencies in Arizona are required by law to report all arrest and disposition information into the repository.

You can access criminal records by using the Arizona Department of Public Safety records search.

However, copies of criminal records are restricted to only authorized people and agencies.

Employee background checks can be done for authorized agencies, including agencies submitting fingerprints with proof of authorized entity requiring it.

However, Arizona does not allow the release of criminal history to private companies for employment.

Arizona inmate records

The Arizona Department of Corrections maintains state prison records.

Every state maintains records on its prison population. For people interested in an inmate’s location, prison term, and pending transfers, inmate records are the best source of information.

What’s on an Arizona inmate record?

An Arizona inmate record contains the following information:

  • Inmate’s name
  • Date of birth
  • Charges, including domestic violence
  • Sentence
  • Location of the inmate, including police department or state government prison
  • The term of imprisonment
  • Physical descriptions
  • A photograph of the inmate

Where can a person find Arizona inmate records?

You will search the Arizona Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation, Reentry website for Arizona inmate records.

You will need the following information about the offender:

  • Last name and first initial
  • Gender
  • Type of incarceration – active, inactive, on supervised parole, or an absconder

Arizona has one exemption to an inmate search. An inmate cannot use the prison database to conduct a search on another inmate.

Inmates get an automatic status update on their information once a year.

Arizona Department of Corrections:
1601 W Jefferson St
Phoenix, AZ 85007

Phone number: 602-542-5497

Arizona Court Records

Court records can be vitally important in some instances.

  • Vetting a public or private position
  • Using the information in another legal case
  • Adoption or custody cases
  • Gaining a government clearance

You must contact the specific court that has the public record. The Arizona judicial branch includes:

  • Justice of the Peace Courts
  • County Superior Courts
  • Tax Courts
  • Municipal Courts
  • Tribal courts
  • Federal District Courts
  • The State Supreme court
  • The State Court of Appeals

What’s on an Arizona court record?

Arizona public court records include all aspects of a court case beginning with the initial arrest or civil court filing.

Arizona criminal records also include:

  • Court transcripts
  • Depositions
  • Dockets
  • Case files
  • Case information
  • Court minutes
  • Court orders
  • Jury records
  • Sentencing
  • Judgment information
  • Witness documentation

You will have printing fees, and court records are long and detailed. Ask the clerk’s office for the price before submitting a request form and other pertinent court information.

Where can a person find Arizona court records?

You will conduct a case search in Arizona using the Clerk of Superior Court Maricopa County

You will need to know which court the case occurred and the case number in to properly make a public records request.

  • Family Court
  • Probate
  • Civil
  • Criminal
  • Tax Court

You can search the Arizona Supreme Court database to access the Supreme Court public records. You can also contact the Clerk of Court’s office by phone or in person.

Arizona Supreme Court
1501 W. Washington
Suite 402
Phoenix, AZ  85007

Phone number: 602-452-3396

Arizona Vital Records

The Arizona Department of Health Services maintains vital records that include:

  • Birth Certificates
  • Marriage Licenses
  • Divorce Decrees
  • Death Records

What information is needed to request an Arizona birth certificate?

The Bureau of Vital Records Request for Copy of Birth Certificate will ask for the following information for a birth certificate request:

  • The date of birth
  • Gender
  • First, middle, and last name
  • Place of birth
  • Mother’s full name before marriage
  • Father’s full name

Where can a person find an Arizona birth certificate?

You can order an Arizona birth certificate online using the Arizona Vital Records website or by completing the Bureau of Vital Records Request for Copy of Birth Certificate and submitting it by mail or in person.

You can find a complete list of Arizona Health Departments.

Mailing Address:
PO Box 6018
Phoenix, AZ 85005

A copy of an Arizona birth certificate is $20.

What information do I need for a death certificate in Arizona?

The Bureau of Vital Records Request for Copy of Death Certificate will ask you the following information to access a public death record:

  • Date of death
  • Gender
  • First, middle, and last name on the death certificate
  • Place of death
  • Date of birth

Where can a person find an Arizona death record?

You can access a death record online using the Arizona Vital Records website or by completing the Bureau of Vital Records Request for Copy of Death Certificate and submitting it by mail or in person.

You can find a complete list of Arizona Health Departments.

Mailing Address:
PO Box 6018
Phoenix, AZ 85005

A copy of an Arizona death certificate is $20.

What information is needed to request a marriage certificate in Arizona?

The Clerk of the Superior Court handles all public requests for marriage certificates in Arizona.

You will need to know the following information when requesting marriage records in Arizona:

  • The full legal name of both spouses before the marriage
  • The year of the marriage
  • The Arizona marriage license number

Where can a person find an existing Arizona marriage record?

You can access an Arizona marriage record at the County Clerk’s office in the jurisdiction the marriage took place.

Example – Maricopa County
Maricopa County Superior Court
201 W Jefferson St
Phoenix, AZ 85003

Phone number: 602-372-5375

You can find a complete list of Superior County Courts.

What information is needed to request a divorce certificate in Arizona?

The Clerk of the Superior Court handles all public requests for divorce records in Arizona.

You will need to know the following information when requesting a divorce certificate in Arizona:

  • The full legal name of both spouses before the marriage
  • The year of the marriage
  • The year of the divorce
  • The Arizona marriage license number

Where can a person find an Arizona divorce record?

You will request an Arizona divorce record at the County Clerk’s office in the jurisdiction the divorce took place.

Example – Maricopa County
Maricopa County Superior Court
201 W Jefferson St
Phoenix, AZ 85003

Phone number: 602-372-5375

You can find a complete list of Superior County Courts.

Arizona Property Records

County Assessors maintain Arizona property records. Public property records can contain a wide variety of information.

  • Residential or commercial purpose
  • Liens
  • Titles
  • Property deeds
  • Mortgages
  • Property tax assessment records
  • Zoning information
  • and Other related documents

What information is needed to request property records in Arizona?

Each County Assessor may require different information for a property records request.

Where can I find an Arizona property record?

You will submit a property record request to the County Assessor in the jurisdiction where the property resides.

Example – Maricopa County
Maricopa County Assessor Office
301 W Jefferson Street
Phoenix, AZ 85003

Phone number: 602-506-3406

FAQs

Can a request be submitted by non-residents in Arizona?

Whether you live in Phoenix or San Diego, any United States citizen can request public documents in Arizona.

Is there a records custodian in Arizona?

Arizona does not have a formal custodian of public records.

Agencies must maintain their own records and handle public records requests in a timely manner.

How long does Arizona have to respond?

The Arizona Revised Statutes, or ARS, do not designate a time limit on a public records response. However, they do state it must be done ‘promptly’.

Is there an appeals process in place in Arizona?

Arizona does not have an administrative appeals process.

In many states, requesters can file a complaint with the attorney general, but that’s not so in Arizona.

Instead, a request can take court action if a state agency denies a request or is unresponsive.

What fees are associated with requesting public records in Arizona?

Every agency charges its own processing fees.

Call the office of the department you are making the request with for the proper instructions and pricing.

Who maintains public voter records in Arizona?

Your local County Recorder maintains public voter records in Arizona.

New Hampshire Public Records

New Hampshire public records laws are complicated and cumbersome. However, you have a right to public information.

To access public records in New Hampshire, it helps to understand the state law and the process used to request them.

Those needing to access records have a right to submit a request through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Every state has different processes, so it’s essential to know the state’s law before requesting any documents.

Table of Contents

What does the New Hampshire public records law say?

The Right to Know Law in New Hampshire has two clear points. First, it specifies a time frame for government agencies to respond to requests, which is five days.

New Hampshire has a restriction that forbids charging processing fees, so obtaining public information in New Hampshire can be cheaper than in other parts of the country.

The law applies to documents as “any information created, accepted, or obtained by, or on behalf of, any public body.”

The state doesn’t have a formal appeals process, so requesters are forced to file court action if the agency doesn’t reply within the five-day window or provide the requested paperwork.

It is unclear whether you must be a resident to request information. The law states “citizens” can request, but there is confusion about whether that means a New Hampshire citizen or an American citizen.

How can I access public records in New Hampshire?

You can find some online to access public records, while others require a request form.

If a request form or a release form is necessary, it can be sent via mail, email, or phone to the record-holding department.

Each department may interpret the citizenship clause differently and exempt the public record law differently.

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. This can be done by email, mail, or phone, depending on the department where the request is submitted.

In general, a public records request should include:

  • Your name
  • Contact information
  • The name of the document
  • Details about the document
  • A time frame that you would like to receive the materials by
  • Document delivery method, mail or email

New Hampshire Criminal Records

Typically, the most common use of a criminal record, or criminal history, is for employment, but there could be other reasons.

More charities, churches, and other volunteer agencies require background screenings before approving applications for volunteering.

People seeking to adopt or foster children will also undergo a background check.

In some cases, those seeking a business partnership will also require mutual background checks.

The New Hampshire State Police Justice Information Bureau Criminal Records Unit maintains criminal records in the state.

What’s on a New Hampshire criminal record?

A criminal background lists all interactions a person has with a law enforcement agency. The details are pulled from many sources, such as local police departments, courts, and the state prison system.

Traffic violations and misdemeanors are not always listed in a criminal record.

More specifically, a criminal record or a background check will provide the following information:

  • Date of birth
  • Driver license number
  • Photograph/mugshot
  • Fingerprints
  • Current and past addresses
  • Former arrest records
  • Current and past warrants
  • Sex offender status

Where can a person find New Hampshire criminal records?

People seeking information about a person’s criminal history can get them from the New Hampshire Department of Safety State Police within the criminal records unit.

Requesters can also request their criminal history records.

A notary or Justice of the Peace signature with a date and seal is requested to do this.

Requesters, in this instance, will need valid photo identification when ordering at the public counter.

The state charges a $25 fee payable to the State of New Hampshire.

The fee can be paid in cash, check, money order, or significant debt or credit card. However, payments must be exactly $25 as change is not given.

Volunteers for a public or private, not-for-profit entity have a reduced fee.

If you decide to obtain a criminal record from another company, New Hampshire adopted the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), which provides an accuracy of public records that stem from a consumer reporting agency.

New Hampshire Inmate Records

Research shows that New Hampshire has 2,701 inmates being held within its jails and prisons. There are reasons to request inmate records, including an employment screening or clearing up past legal irregularities after being cleared of a crime.

Crime victims also find it helpful to know the status of an offender and pursue possible civil court action where needed.

The New Hampshire Department of Corrections (DOC) maintains records in the state.

What’s on a New Hampshire inmate record?

New Hampshire, like many states, contains basic information on inmate records. Record checks can provide the following information:

  • Name and aliases
  • Date of Birth
  • Height and weight
  • DOC ID
  • Booking photo
  • Assigned location
  • Sentence summary

Where can I find New Hampshire inmate records?

You will use the New Hampshire Department of Corrections Inmate Locator to access an inmate record.

Information is pulled from the DOC Offender Records Office in Concord, New Hampshire.

It has active sentencing information under the law in which the conviction occurred. It also displays the minimum and maximum release dates, pending consecutive sentences, tech parole violations, and New Hampshire incarcerated inmates housed in state facilities.

To conduct an inmate search, those requesting information will need all or part of the inmate’s last name and all or part of their first name.

There is no fee for this online service.

New Hampshire Court Records

Court records can provide much information for those looking at a specific case.

The files are typically quite large as they contain copies of all legal action, plus depositions and other testimony. There could be several reasons for wanting a copy of court records, but the most common is to tie it to ongoing litigation in another case.

What’s on a New Hampshire court record?

Court records have an enormous amount of information. They typically pull together information from several courts into the one case file that includes all the action on the case.

Most people find the following documents the most helpful:

  • Court minutes
  • Case files
  • Dockets
  • Court opinions
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgment documentation
  • Jury records and files
  • Witness documentation
  • Case information

Where can I find New Hampshire court records?

You will need to contact the New Hampshire Judicial Branch where the court record is maintained.

New Hampshire Vital Records

The New Hampshire Division of Vital Records Administration (DVRA) maintains vital records in the state.

New Hampshire vital records include:

  • Birth Certificates
  • Death Certificates
  • Marriage Licenses
  • Divorce Decrees

Public record requests for vital records in New Hampshire will vary depending on the document you are requesting.

Division of Vital Records Administration
Division of Vital Records Administration
Archives Building
71 South Fruit Street
Concord, NH 03301-2410

Phone number: 603-271-4651

What information do I need to request a New Hampshire birth certificate?

The Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record will ask for specific information when ordering a birth record.

  • Full name on the birth record
  • Gender
  • Birthdate
  • Place of birth
  • Parents’ full names before marriage

Where can I find a New Hampshire birth certificate?

You can request a certified copy of a New Hampshire birth record by completing the Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record and submitting it by mail or in person to the DVRA or your local City or Town Clerk

The cost of a certified birth certificate in New Hampshire is $15, and $10 for every additional copy.

What information do I need for a death certificate in New Hampshire?

The Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record will ask for specific information when ordering a death record.

  • Full name on the death record
  • Gender
  • Date of death
  • Place of death

Where can I find a New Hampshire death certificate?

You can request a certified copy of a New Hampshire death record by completing the Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record and submitting it by mail or in person to the DVRA or your local City or Town Clerk

The cost of a certified death certificate in New Hampshire is $15, and $10 for every additional copy.

What information do I need for a marriage certificate in New Hampshire?

The Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record will ask for specific information when ordering a marriage record.

  • Full names before marriage.
  • Date of marriage.
  • Place the marriage took place.

Where can I find a New Hampshire marriage certificate?

You can request a certified copy of a New Hampshire marriage record by completing the Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record and submitting it by mail or in person to the DVRA or your local City or Town Clerk

The cost of a certified marriage certificate in New Hampshire is $15, and $10 for every additional copy.

What information do I need for a divorce certificate in New Hampshire?

The Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record will ask for specific information when ordering a divorce record.

  • Full names before marriage
  • Date of the divorce decree
  • Place the divorce was granted

Where can I find a New Hampshire divorce certificate?

You can request a certified copy of a New Hampshire divorce record by completing the Application for a Certified Copy of Vital Record and submitting it by mail or in person to the DVRA or your local City or Town Clerk

The cost of a certified divorce decree in New Hampshire is $15, and $10 for every additional copy.

New Hampshire Property Records

The Registry of Deeds Office maintains all property transaction maintains property records in the state.

The property records you can access include:

  • Liens
  • Land records
  • Titles
  • Property deeds
  • Real estate information
  • Mortgages
  • Property tax assessment records
  • Zoning information
  • Probate

For data, parcel, and tax maps, you will need to contact the Geographic Information System(GIS) to ask about public access.

What information do I need to request property records in New Hampshire?

You will need basic information to access a public property record in New Hampshire.

Forms, fees, and office hours will vary depending on the County Clerk’s Office.

Where can I find a New Hampshire property record?

You will need to contact the New Hampshire County Registers of Deeds Office where the property record is maintained.

Example – Hillsborough Register of Deeds
Hillsborough Register of Deeds website
19 Temple St
Nashua, NH 03060

Phone number: 603-882-6399

FAQs

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of New Hampshire?

New Hampshire law states you must be a citizen, but it is unclear whether that means a citizen of New Hampshire or the United States.

Public officials in different agencies have different interpretations. In other words, it may make a difference if you live in Manchester as opposed to Miami when it comes to requesting records.

Is there a records custodian in New Hampshire?

New Hampshire does not mandate a public records custodian.

What exemptions exist for public records in New Hampshire?

The New Hampshire Right to Know Law lays out exemptions including grand jury and petit jury records, personal information, school records, preliminary drafts, and other documents deemed to be an invasion of privacy.

How long does New Hampshire have to respond to a public records request?

All New Hampshire government entities have up to five days to respond.

Is there an appeals process in place for public records requests in New Hampshire?

New Hampshire does not have a process available to appeal a public records decision.

If you feel that an agency has violated Freedom of Information laws, contact the New Hampshire Attorney General.

What fees are associated with requesting public records in New Hampshire?

There are different fees for different types of records and public record searches. For instance, death certificates are $15 for the first copy and $10 per copy.

New Hampshire also charges a non-refundable search fee, but there is a restriction against charging processing fees.

  • Updated April 28, 2022
  • States

Top School Districts in Wyoming, 2021

wyoming_top_school_district_banner_2020

Many know Wyoming as a rugged, expansive natural playground, sparsely populated and home to a number of vast, beautiful state and national parks. Yet, few are aware that the Cowboy State is one of the best in the nation for education, with well-funded schools characterized by high performance in academics and standardized testing. Here’s a look at Wyoming’s five best school districts. 

Albany County School District #1 is the best public school system in Wyoming. Comprising fifteen schools with an enrollment of over 4,000 in the southeastern part of the state, ACSD#1 boasts a math proficiency rate higher than state and national averages, and 105 students of the graduating class of 2018 received the Hathaway Scholarship

Wyoming’s 2nd best school district is Sheridan County School District #2, made up of ten high-performing schools with a considerable list of accolades, including a remarkable eight National Blue Ribbon Award honors.

Placing 3rd is Park County School District #16, a single-school district based in Meeteetse with an enrollment of 121. Students of the district graduate at a rate of 92.3% and over 70% are proficient in mathematics.    

Natrona County School District earns Wyoming’s #4 spot. An expansive district based in the city of Caspar and serving around 13,000 students, NCSD is the largest employer in Natrona County and plays a central role in the lives of many of its residents.

Rounding out the list of Wyoming’s best school districts is Fremont County School District #2, consisting of a single K-12 school in the small town of Dubois. Despite its modest size, FCSD#2 offers an extensive, wide-ranging curriculum that gives students plenty of opportunity to specialize in their subjects of interest. 

Top School Districts in Wyoming, 2020

RankDistrict
1Albany County School District #1
2Sheridan County School District #2
3Park County School District #16
4Natrona County School District #1
5Fremont County School District # 2
6Lincoln County School District #2
7Sweetwater County School District #1
8Teton County School District #1
9Campbell County School District #1
10Washakie County School District #2
11Fremont County School District #24
12Sheridan County School District #3
13Sweetwater County School District #2
14Sublette County School District #1
15Sheridan County School District #1
16Laramie County School District #1
17Converse County School District #1
18Park County School District # 1
19Uinta County School District #1
20Carbon County School District #2

Methodology

The following variables contributed to the ranking: number of students (K-12), graduation rate, school funding per student, student to teacher ratio, percent of students scoring above proficient in standardized state Math test, percent of students scoring above proficient in standardized state Reading and Language test. Data from a total of 10,247 public school districts were used to compute a score for each school district. The following states were omitted due to lack of sufficient data: Hawaii, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Utah, and Virginia. Note that high schools in some states have their own independent districts.

Did your district make the list? Share the good news!

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