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Mississippi Public Records

Interested in looking at Mississippi public records? Finding and requesting a public record can be a chore, mostly because records are scattered across multiple state agencies. With the help of this guide, it should be easier to locate what you’re looking for. 

Mississippi complies with the Mississippi Public Records Act (PRA) that was enacted in 1983. The act provides clear guidance on how the state’s 25 million public records can be provided to requestors. 

To learn more about requesting criminal records, inmate records, court records, and vital records, keep reading.

What does the Mississippi public records law say?

The Mississippi Public Records Act is a succession of laws that are designed to allow the general public access to access public records. These open records include books, papers, letters, accounts, photographs, maps, cards, films, documentary materials, and other data required to be maintained by any public body. All state agencies are subject to the law.

Exemptions include employment applications, personnel matters, tax records of an individual, academic examination questions, information regarding the purchase or sale of property for public purposes, and attorney work product concerning litigation. 

Anyone can publicly request access to Mississippi’s public records and you don’t have to state a reason for your request. There are no restrictions placed on the use of records either.

The Mississippi Public Records Act says state departments have seven business days to respond to a records search. However, departments may establish their own time limits of up to fourteen working days.

To learn more about freedom of information in the state of Mississippi, visit Mississippi.gov.

How can a person access public records in Mississippi?

Some records can be accessed online while others must be formally requested. If a request is necessary, the form can be delivered via mail, email, or by phone to the record-holding department. 

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

In general, a public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID-19, some public offices may have limited hours of operation. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead.

Mississippi criminal records

The criminal activities of a person can be found easily through a criminal record search. Mississippi criminal records are usually assembled from various sources and compiled into one database where they are availed to the public.

What’s on a criminal record?

A criminal record provides a detailed record of a person’s interactions with law enforcement. These records are pulled from various sources and include arrest records, convictions, and incarcerations within the state’s four prisons. 

More specifically, a criminal record or a background check will provide the following information: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthday, nationality, etc.
  • A mug shot and full set of fingerprints
  • A list of distinguishing features like tattoos and other physical attributes
  • The type of offense (misdemeanor or felony) and description of the crime

Where can a person find Mississippi criminal records?

The Mississippi Department of Public Safety (MDPS) is the parent agency of the Criminal Information Center (CIC), serving as the administrator for criminal history improvement programs for the State of Mississippi. 

These records can be found either online or through local sources, like visiting your local law enforcement agency. 

The mission of the department is to maintain a repository of criminal records and provide fingerprint-based identification services to law enforcement and other criminal justice entities in the State of Mississippi and throughout the United States. These generated criminal background reports may be accessed online, from local sources, or through the official Mississippi State Records Online Database.

Mississippi inmate records

Persons who commit offenses in Mississippi are taken to various correctional facilities such as prisons, jails, and penal institutions. Requestors can access inmate’s records upon request.

What’s on an inmate record?

The information listed on an inmate record varies, but in Michigan the records usually contain a combination of personal information and specific details about a person’s incarceration situation. Public access to inmate records can provide the following information when accessed: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthdate, and gender
  • A mug shot
  • Inmate location
  • Inmate registration number
  • Jail transfer information
  • Custody status

Where can a person find Mississippi inmate records?

All information about incarcerated persons in Mississippi State is maintained by the individual institutions. However they can be found at the Mississippi Department of Corrections website. You can conduct a simple search for an offender using a person’s name or ID number. 

Mississippi court records

According to the Mississippi Public Records Act of 1941, all residents within a state have a right to access court records to ensure transparency between the government and its residents. 

Court records can be the most complicated records to request because you often need to visit specific courthouses to gain access. However, Mississippi has an online system, which will ease your search.

What’s on a court record?

In most cases, court records are quite large and come with many different documents. Most people find the following documents the most helpful: 

  • Court minutes
  • Case files
  • Dockets
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgment documentation
  • Jury records and files
  • Witness documentation

Where can a person find Mississippi court records?

The Mississippi court system encompasses eight different types of courts, each with a specific delegated role in the judicial system. The Mississippi Judiciary is a site designed to provide public access to these courts and their decisions. General information about every level of the court system and judicial and staff directories are available for each court. 

If you can’t find what you’re looking for online, you’ll need to reach out to the court clerk where the case was heard. Dockets, briefs, orders, and opinions of the courts where the respective cases were held can be accessed online by searching the name or identification number of the inmate or the attorney’s name.

Mississippi vital records

The Mississippi State Department of Health is in charge of all birth records, marriage records, divorce records, and death records of everybody in the state. Upon request, the records are offered at a fee.

What information is needed to request a vital record?

To obtain a vital record in Mississippi, like a birth certificate or death certificates, a person must provide certain information to aid in the search. The information needed includes: 

  • The location of the event
  • The approximate date of the event
  • The full name of the person, including maiden names 
  • A case file number for divorce records
  • The license number for a marriage record

Where can a person find Mississippi vital records?

In order to access the records, one can either order online through mail, request online and pay via credit card, or book an in-person appointment at their physical offices in Ridgeland or Highland Colony Parkway.

Given the pandemic, many government agencies are asking people to use online options whenever possible to limit in-person contact. If you’re looking to order a certified copy of a birth certificate, death certificate, marriage record, or divorce records, you can do so online. 

Frequently asked questions about Mississippi records

As you continue your quest for public records, you may have additional questions. Here are several FAQs and answers that can help.

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes, a request can be submitted by non-residents of the state. Residents in Jakson, Chancery, or Manhattan can access records in the state.

How long does that state have to respond?

The state has exactly seven days to respond. In a case where an extension is needed, the agency can extend for a further seven days upon request.

Is there a records custodian in Mississippi?

Yes there is a records custodian in Mississippi. 

What exemptions exist?

Mississippi has 32 exemptions on the books. Generally, these exemptions resemble those listed by other states that protect personal information, public safety, and trade secrets. 

Is there an appeals process in place?

Yes, there is an appeals process in place although there is a short window of time. One has to appeal within 30 days with the Mississippi Supreme Court from the day the agency rejected your request. 

Unlike other states that have an administrative appeal process through the attorney general, Mississippi does have this option. However, you can speak with the Ethics Commission to get their opinion before filing an appeal suit.

What fees are associated with requesting public records?

In Mississippi, each department can come up with its own “reasonable” fee structure for things like making copies of requested records. In some cases, a requester may be charged for labor as well, especially if the request is lengthy and ties up office staff and resources. 

  • Updated December 5, 2020
  • States

South Dakota Public Records

You need a quick background check or a copy of a criminal record from South Dakota, but want to find the best place to search. When you’re stuck and don’t know where to turn for South Dakota Public Records, look no further. 

South Dakota’s public records, including those held by government agencies, can be obtained by citizens of the state and other persons seeking a record. You can search and receive documents from agencies that store vital, court, criminal and judicial records.

What does the South Dakota public records law say?

The South Dakota Public Records Law was updated in 2009 to follow many of the suggestions in the federal Freedom of Information Act. 

You do not have to be a resident to request records from South Dakota. 

The South Dakota Open Records Law does not include the judicial system, but you can obtain executive and legislative branch documents. 

You should only be charged the actual fee for copying the records. Some fees may be waived if the record release is in the public’s best interest. You can file an appeal within 30 days to the Office of the Hearing examiner if you are not granted your records request. 

Information may be redacted on the document and which falls under the invasion of privacy, a threat to public safety or security. This is a partial denial for records. 

To learn more, visit SouthDakota.gov.

How can a person access public records in South Dakota?

Some records are online and some records must be requested in writing. For public records access in South Dakota, a person must submit a public records request. The request is sent via mail, email, mail, or by phone to the record-holding department. 

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

In general, a public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID-19, some public offices may have limited hours of operation. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead.

South Dakota criminal records

Employers who want to run a background check on a potential employee can do so with the use of criminal records searches. To assist businesses find those criminal records, information and resources are listed below.

What’s on a criminal record?

South Dakota provides the following information on a criminal record:

  • Name
  • Date of birth
  • Physical description
  • Case number
  • Charges
  • Sentencing information
  • Release date
  • Status
  • Conviction statute

Where can a person find South Dakota criminal records?

Any person who has been arrested for misdemeanors or felonies in South Dakota will be in their State’s Computerized Criminal History system. You can use this system for background searches for employment. 

To run a background check, the system is 100% fingerprint-based. Records on arrests, bail/bonds, conviction, probation, and facility location are available for a fee. There is a charge of $26.75 and requires a signed waiver

To begin, call 605-773-3331 for a free fingerprint kit. The fingerprint card must be completed and include the applicant’s name, date of birth, gender, and social security number. The individual inquiring must take the fingerprint card to the local law enforcement agency for printing. The fee is $26.75 and needs to be in the form of a check or money order. 

South Dakota does not store information on persons on probation or any persons in the county jails.

South Dakota inmate records

South Dakota has six main prisons with the state penitentiary located in Sioux Falls. These prisons house over 3,800 inmates. 

What’s on an inmate record?

South Dakota records contain personal information about a person’s incarceration situation. The Department of Corrections inmate locator provides the following information:

  • Name and aliases
  • DOC number
  • Age
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Physical description
  • Current facility
  • Status
  • Parole office

Where can a person find South Dakota inmate records?

To gain access to prisoner information, you can access records online. The South Dakota Department of Corrections maintains the records for anyone to access via an inmate locator. 

To find an inmate, enter the DOC #, last name, and first name of that person. 

South Dakota court records

Finding court records is one of the trickier records to access because most of the time you have to get them from a clerk of courts at specific county courthouses. To conduct a public records search, it helps to have an understanding of the South Dakota court system. 

Courts in South Dakota include the Supreme Court, Circuit Courts, Small Claims Court, and Problem Solving Courts like Drug, DUI, Mental Health, and Veterans Treatment Courts. When you know which court may hold the files you need, it is easier to track them down.

The Supreme Court in South Dakota is comprised of a chief justice and four associate justices who hear appeals on decisions set forth by the lower courts. The court can advise the state’s governor. 

The South Dakota Circuit Courts are the trial courts for both criminal and civil cases. The trials for any felony in South Dakota would happen in a circuit court. Civil cases exceeding $10,000 would be tried here. 

The Problem Solving Courts were at first created to help with an increase in drug cases. Since it was successful, the other courts like the Mental Health Court were added to streamline the court system. 

The Small Claims Court is organized so that people can sue for losses of money or property. The dollar limits for small claims is $12,000 or less. 

You can request criminal cases unless they have been sealed. They are available from 1989 to the present. Civil cases, from 2003 to the present, can be requested unless sealed. Civil money judgments are found here from April 19, 2004, until the present. 

What’s on a court record?

Depending on the length of time of the case, court records can be quite lengthy. Court records that you can obtain are:

  • Court minutes
  • Dockets
  • Case files
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgment documentation
  • Witness documentation
  • Jury records and files

Where can a person find South Dakota court records?

Search this database for criminal and protection orders. Enter the system as a guest to use your credit card. The fee is $20.00 even if you have no results. 

Civil money judgments can be found at the South Dakota Unified Judicial System

by entering a name and password. Searches covered are  judgments from April 19, 2004, to the present. Searches are by name but also include date ranges. You may search by county. The fee is $4.00 per name, plus a $1.00 handling fee to access the docket. You can use a credit or debit card. You will be charged even if there is no result. 

Civil and criminal records can be obtained through email using South Dakota Court Records Email and completing the application. It will cost $20.00 per name. 

South Dakota vital records

You can order birth, death, marriage, and divorce records from South Dakota. These can be requested in person, through the mail, online, or over the phone. Records can be released to the person requesting the records, the spouse, children, parents, guardian, or even next of kin. South Dakota stores vital records after 1905. 

What information is needed to request a vital record?

You need to show identification photo ID (state, federal, or tribal). If you do not have a photo ID you can show two other proofs of identity such as social security card, car registration, utility bill with current address, or bank statement with current address. 

Where can a person find South Dakota vital records?

The South Dakota Department of Health refers all inquiries for birth records, death records, marriage records, and divorce records to VitalCheck, an online portal used by many states to facilitate public access to vital records. 

Through this system a person can obtain a death certificate, for example, for a fee. The fee is $15.00 for the certificate and $6.50 for Vitalchek. You can request UPS overnight for an extra fee. You will need to pay with a credit card. 

You can mail in a request by completing the application at South Dakota Vital Records Check Application. You need it notarized or a clean and clear copy of your photo ID must be added. Send a check or money order for $15.00, Mail it to the State Office in Pierre, South Dakota.

Frequently asked questions about South Dakota records

The basic questions asked about South Dakota records are compiled here for your use. 

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes. Anyone in the United State can submit a request, you do not need to be a citizen of the state to request records. 

Is there a records custodian in South Dakota?

There is no records custodian but the Office of Hearing Examiners manages administrative appeals of the public records decisions. 

Are property records public? 

Yes. To access real estate records, visit the register of deeds.  

What exemptions exist?

The state of South Dakota does exempt the judicial courts from public records release. On top of that, there are 35 other records that are exempt. It will be prudent for you to check to see if the records you are hunting are exempt. A partial exemption list includes financial accounts, trade secrets, law enforcement methods, inmate disciplinary matters, personal correspondence and notes from public officials, personal information that invades privacy, and information that could endanger public safety. 

How long does that state have to respond?

The agencies must grant, deny, or extend your request within 10 days. 

Is there an appeals process in place?

South Dakota does have an appeals process. You must submit your appeal within 30 days after the records release decision. You can appeal to the Office of Hearing Examiner. If this request fails, you can file with the circuit court within the district which holds the records. 

What fees are associated with requesting public records?

Fess that are charged to an individual requesting records must be kept at that actual cost. A records search can be charged at $7.50 an hour and copying fees are $0.10 a page. Any fee over $10.00 needs to be prepaid. If fees will exceed $50.00 an estimate must be sent to the requestor. 

  • Updated November 2, 2020
  • States

Wisconsin Public Records

The Wisconsin Open Records Act was enacted in 1981 and states that the public has a right to collect and analyze all public records unless it is expressly against the law. The state has more than 50 million records. 

Read through this comprehensive guide to understand the public records system in the state. You’ll find helpful resources to access criminal records, inmate records, court records, and vital records.

What does the Wisconsin public records law say?

In Wisconsin, the state law mimics many of the statutes in the federal law, also known as Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). 

All branches of government are open for requests, which must be handled as quickly as possible, although more specific language does not exist in the law. 

The state attorney general is tasked with hearing complaints and disputes about requests, and can issue opinions to agencies that are generally followed. If a request is improperly dealt with by a public records officer, a fine of up to $1,000 could apply. This includes fee disputes, as fees are to be kept to direct actual cost of labor or copying. Fee waivers are available.

Wisconsin law says requesters do not have to be a citizen of the state to access the public records. 

How can a person access public records in Wisconsin?

Requesters can access public records online or by sending a formal request to the record-holding department. If a formal request is necessary, you can deliver it by mail, email, or by phone. 

State agencies differ, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

In general, a public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID-19, some public offices may have limited office hours. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead.

Wisconsin criminal records

In Wisconsin, all individual history records from various local and county sources are centralized and organized into one database. Criminal background reports are available to the public.

What’s on a criminal record?

A criminal record provides a detailed record of a person’s interactions with law enforcement. These records are pulled from various sources and include arrest records, convictions, and incarcerations within the state’s four prisons. 

More specifically, a criminal record or a background check will provide the following information: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthday, nationality, etc.
  • A mug shot and full set of fingerprints
  • A list of distinguishing features like tattoos and other physical attributes
  • The type of offense (misdemeanor or felony) and description of the crime

Where can a person find Wisconsin criminal records?

Criminal records including arrest records are available to employees through the Wisconsin Department of Justice Crime Information Bureau. Most employers conduct a search using a person’s name as opposed to one with fingerprints. While fingerprint-based records are more accurate, most employers opt for the name-based search because it’s cheaper and easier to do. 

To conduct a search online, simply click on the link above. You will need to set up an account to access records. 

The CIB is responsible for the maintenance of criminal history information submitted by local law enforcement agencies in Wisconsin. The unit maintains more than 1.3 million records, which have been received from law enforcement agencies, district attorney offices, clerks of court, and municipal courts throughout the State of Wisconsin.

Wisconsin inmate records

Inmate records for Wisconsin consist of offenders that are held across the state prisons, correctional inmate facilities, detention centers, and penal institutions throughout the state. Overseen by the Wisconsin Department of Corrections, they may also include information on sentencing, the class and type of offense, the parish where a case was tried, and the facility location of the inmate. 

What’s on an inmate record?

The information listed on an inmate record varies, but in Wisconsin the records usually contain a combination of personal information and specific details about a person’s incarceration situation. Public access to inmate records can provide the following information when accessed: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthdate, and gender
  • A mug shot
  • Inmate location
  • Inmate registration number
  • Jail transfer information
  • Custody status

Where can a person find Wisconsin inmate records?

Through the Offender Locator portal, information can be attained on inmates within the Wisconsin Department of Corrections (WDOC). There, users are allowed access to information regarding the inmate status of any individual throughout the system. Access to the portal requires entering an offender’s last name or ID number.

The system will return search results matching data points, with the following additional fields: first name, birth year, race, county where the disposition of the person’s criminal case occurred (or where incarcerated), zip code, and current status. 

Members of the public can obtain inmate information or locate inmates by using the search engine tool provided by the Wisconsin Department of Corrections. There are also web services managed by the county’s sheriff’s office that can be used to narrow down the search to specific county jails.

Wisconsin court records

Accessing court records can be complicated. In most states, a requester must identify the courthouse where a case was heard and request documents from the court clerk. In Wisconsin, the process is easier. The state has an online database.

What’s on a court record?

In most cases, court records are quite large and come with many different documents. Most people find the following documents the most helpful: 

  • Court minutes
  • Case files
  • Dockets
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgment documentation
  • Jury records and files
  • Witness documentation

Where can a person find Wisconsin court records?

Wisconsin has an online database that can provides instant access to court records. The system holds records from circuit courts, the court of appeals, and the supreme court. To search records, you’ll need some basic information. You can search for records by name, birthdate, or business name. The more information you can provide, the more likely you are to find the records. 

If you can’t find the records you’re looking for, you’ll need to go access records the old fashion way. You’ll need to contact the court clerk in the courthouse where the case was heard. This person can provide public court documents to you, although you may need to fill out a formal request. 

Wisconsin vital records

The Wisconsin Department of Health Vital Records office maintains all birth records, marriage records, divorce records, death records, and partnerships records. For partnerships, start dates and termination dates may be needed to access the records.

What information is needed to request a vital record?

To obtain a vital record in Wisconsin, a person must provide certain information to aid in the search. The information needed includes: 

  • The location of the event
  • The approximate date of the event
  • The full name of the person, including maiden names 
  • A case file number for divorce records
  • The license number for a marriage record

Where can a person find Wisconsin vital records?

Due to COVID-19, in person appointments are suspended as the vital records offices are closed. Mail, online, and phone services are still available. State officials encourage people to use the online option, which can be done by clicking the link above. 

To access vital records, you need to be listed on the record or be a family member. While vital records are considered “public” they’re only released to certain people. You’ll likely need to prove your identity by providing an ID. 

Mail orders should be sent to the State Vital Records Office, PO Box 309, Madison, WI 53701-0309. 

If you have a court imposed deadline or have additional questions, please email dhsvitalrecords@dhs.wisconsin.gov or call 608-266-1373. 

Frequently asked questions about Wisconsin records

To learn more about the open records law and specific Wisconsin statutes, here’s a list of frequently asked questions.

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes, requests can be submitted by non-residents of the state. Any United States citizen can request records from Wisconsin. 

Is there a legal custodian in Wisconsin?

There is no definite records custodian in Wisconsin, however, the attorney general gives advice and guidance to agencies concerning all matters of public records.

What exemptions exist?

The Wisconsin Open Records Act sought to reduce the number of exemptions on file. There are eight exemptions that deal with matters such as law enforcement and trade secrets as defined by the Uniform Trade Secrets Act. Other exemptions protect personnel records or some records may contain redaction of personal details or identifiable information, like a person’s home address. 

How long does that state have to respond?

In the state of Wisconsin, there are no timelines set for state officials to respond to a request. Delays without explanation can lead to disputes among the parties involved.

Is there an appeals process in place?

Should any disputes arise, the state of Wisconsin provides for an appeals process that’s in place. The process involves filing with the court that the agency in question resides in within 45 days from the time the final response was given.

What are the fees associated with requesting public records?

The fees associated with requesting public records, which includes getting copies of records, are nominal. Municipalities charge fees for the copies depending on whether it is black and white or a colored copy. The black and white copies are relatively cheaper than the colored copies.

The media or those requesting the public records for public interest may get fees waived.

  • Updated December 5, 2020
  • States

Nebraska Public Records

For anyone looking to access public records in Nebraska, you’re in luck. The state has a strong public records law on the books that gives the public access to many records in many different state agencies. 

Unlike some states that only allow residents to access public records, Nebraska allows any U.S. citizen access to records. It doesn’t matter if you live in Lincoln, Omaha, New York City, or Miami, anyone can request Nebraska public records. 

While access isn’t restricted, the processes of finding and requesting records can be a bit challenging. Records are kept by different branches of government and by different state agencies, so it can be difficult to know where to start looking. 

We suggest starting your search at Nebraska.gov to learn about the state and its public records laws. In addition, this guide should prove helpful to anyone planning to request public records. 

What does the Nebraska public records law say?

The Nebraska Public Records Law was passed in 1975 and states that “all citizens of this state, and all other persons interested in the examination of the public records” may have access to them.  Record requestors don’t need to state a purpose to obtain records either. 

All states do exempt some public records from the public records law. In Nebraska, records that are exempt include any records that include personal information, medical records, law enforcement records, trade secrets, any security-related information, credit information, archaeological records, and employment records. 

All branches of the state government including the executive, legislative, and judicial branches must adhere to the public records in the Nebraska constitution. 

The state specifies a response time in the law, which is one of the fastest turnaround times in the United States: 4 business days. 

How can a person access public records in Nebraska?

For public records access in Nebraska, a person must submit a public records request to the specific agency holding the record that you want to see. Most requests can be made by email, over the phone, or in-person. Some departments do, however, require a written request.  

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

In general, a public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID, some public offices may have limited hours of operation. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead.

Nebraska criminal records

Criminal records provide a report of a person’s interactions with law enforcement. Employers tend to request criminal records to screen new employees. Employers want to make sure that the person they plan to hire has a clean record, which can be verified by accessing criminal records. 

What’s on a criminal record?

A criminal record lists criminal activity, arrest history, indictment records and incarceration information. When a record is pulled, you’ll likely find the following information:

  • Personal information like name, date of birth, gender
  • Aliases
  • Physical descriptors
  • Records of any criminal conviction
  • Court orders
  • Warrant
  • Charges
  • Probation and probation orders
  • Convicted crimes

Where can a person find Nebraska criminal records?

To access criminal reports, reach out to the Nebraska State Patrol. The agency maintains these records, which are called Nebraska Records of Arrest and Prosecution (RAP). These records only provide criminal acts that a person is fingerprinted for, so things like minor traffic violations will not be included in the reports. 

The public records law gives anyone, including employers, the ability to access these records by filling out a request form or by using an online portal. 

To request a record, you need to provide a person’s full name and date of birth. The search results are more accurate if a social security number is also provided.

Nebraska inmate records

Inmate records, as you might expect, provide information about a person incarcerated in the state of Nebraska. A person’s offenses and the category of the offense, be it a misdemeanor or a felony, will be listed on this type of record. 

What’s on an inmate record?

An inmate record can provide personal information like race, date of birth, and nationality, but most people are looking for more specific details. The information on a Nebraska inmate record is usually  pulled from several different law enforcement agencies and provides information about the offender’s:

  • Status
  • Location
  • Crime  
  • Earliest possible release date

Where can a person find Nebraska inmate records?

Inmate records are kept by the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services. To locate an offender, there is a search page that can be accessed online by anyone. To get the best results, you’ll need to enter a DCS Id Number. A search can be conducted with an inmate’s first and last name as well.  

Nebraska court records

To access Nebraska court records, it’s helpful to understand how the court system works. The supreme court is the highest court authority, followed by the court of appeals. The court of appeals oversees decisions made by lower courts, which in Nebraska are made up of 93 superior and trial courts spread across the state. 

What’s on a court record?

Court record details vary, but in Nebraska, most people find these pieces the most helpful: 

  • Court minutes
  • Case files
  • Descriptions and details of open meetings
  • Dockets
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgment documentation
  • Jury records and files
  • Witness documentation

Where can a person find Nebraska court records?

In many states, accessing court records can be one of the most tedious and time-consuming. However, Nebraska has a searchable database that can provide a lot of information without sending special requests or talking with state officials on the phone. 

To view court cases, visit the Nebraska Judicial Branch website. On this site, requesters can access criminal, civil, traffic, juvenile, and probate cases filed in all of the state’s county and district courts. You will be able to determine case detail, parties involved, court cost information and registrar of actions. If you want copies, you need to request them from the clerk of the court at the courthouse where the case was heard.

To conduct a search, there is a fee of $15 per search.

Nebraska vital records

Vital Records are records that mark life’s milestones, like birth, marriage, divorce, and death. 

In Nebraska, such records are only available to the person listed on the record, an immediate family member, or an authorized legal representative of an eligible person. Nebraska isn’t the only state that has strict rules on who can access vital records. Most states have similar rules in place. 

What information is needed to request a vital record?

To access a vital record, which is usually in the form of a certificate, like a marriage certificate or a death certificate, you’ll need to bring ID. The state won’t release information to just anyone, as mentioned above. 

In addition, you’ll need to provide information about the vital records that you’re trying to view. Expect to provide a person’s name, which includes both a maiden and married name, along with the date of the event.

Where can a person find Nebraska vital records?

Vital records in the state of Nebraska are administered by the Nebraska Department of Health & Human Services. A request for any of these documents requires that you prove “proper purpose” in the application. This means that you must either show that you are listed on the record or are a relative or legal guardian of the registrant. 

For those who prefer to access records online, the state of Nebraska does have an online portal. On this portal, you can request a record and receive a certified copy. The processing time is about two weeks and there is a charge for each certified copy. 

Frequently asked questions about Nebraska records

For those looking to access a public record from a government agency, here’s a list of frequently asked questions to help clarify the rules in Nebraska:

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes. The law does not say that being a resident of the state is required to gain access to public records. 

Is there a records custodian in Nebraska?

No. The law says that all requests should go to the record-keeping agency. This is part of the challenge with accessing public records. Before a record can be accessed, a person must know which agency has the records to begin with. Sometimes tracking that information down is more time consuming than making the record request. 

What exemptions exist?

No government agency is exempt and that includes the Nebraska legislature. However, exemptions are made for records that include personal information, medical records, law enforcement records, trade secrets, any security-related information, credit information, archaeological records, and employment records. 

How long does that state have to respond?

The state has four business days to respond to a request and must make reasonable good faith efforts to fulfill all requests that come in. 

Is there an appeal process in place?

There is no administrative appeal option provided. Court action may be taken at the district court in the jurisdiction in which the request was made. 

If a request is ignored, you can inform the head of the agency or petition the attorney general as a means of action.  

What fees are associated with requesting public records?

You can take your own scanner into a department in some cases and make your own copies. However, if this is not permitted, there could be a cost for the records. However, the law says the first four hours of staff time is free. After that, a special service charge can be levied. 

  • Updated October 13, 2020
  • States

Louisiana Public Records

Trying to find the public records you need in any state can be difficult as it isn’t usually a streamlined process. WIth records maintained in departments across the state, some are very hard to find, while others aren’t as accessible to the general public. 

The public records law in Louisiana applies to all branches of state government, nonprofit corporations, and includes all public documents. Louisiana laws do have a few unique clauses to it, one of which applies to its vital records. In the state, birth and death records become public records 100 years after the date filed and become available in the state archives. 

Everyone has access to public records and no stated purpose is necessary. 

To help people understand how to access records as a United States. citizen, we have compiled this state-specific guide. By using this, people will better understand state law and be able to access criminal, inmate, court, and vital records. 

What does the Louisiana public records law say?

The Louisiana Public Records Act, also known as the state’s Sunshine Law first defines what constitutes as public records (which includes books, records, writings, photographs, microfilm, and more) aside from those that have been exempted by the Constitution of Louisiana.

In three days or less, a public official must respond to requesters, no matter what the state of the process is. Within five days of submitting a request, it is possible to initiate legal proceedings if a request is ignored or denied. But in the state of Louisiana, there is no formal appeals process like seeking an attorney general opinion.  

Under the authority of the constitution, exemptions to these include, pending criminal litigation, juvenile status offenders, sexual assault victims, security procedures, trade secrets, and some public employee data. Legislative records in Louisiana are covered by the law, with the Louisiana Revised Statutes covering the details. 

How can a person access public records in Louisiana?

Some public records can be accessed in Louisiana online while others will require a physical form to be submitted. If a request is necessary, it can be sent via mail, email, or by phone to the record-holding department. 

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

General public records requests can be sent to the secretary of state.  

In general, such public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID-19, some public offices may have limited hours of operation. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead. 

Louisiana criminal records

In the state of Louisiana, criminal records are typically accessed by employers that want to check the backgrounds of any potential employee. In order to assist employees in finding criminal records, we have provided some useful information and resources below. 

What’s on a criminal record?

A criminal record provides a detailed record of a person’s interactions with law enforcement. These records are pulled from various sources and include arrest records, convictions, and incarcerations within the state’s four prisons. 

More specifically, a criminal record or a background check will provide the following information: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthday, nationality, etc.
  • A mugshot and full set of fingerprints
  • A list of distinguishing features like tattoos and other physical attributes
  • The type of offense (misdemeanor or felony) and description of the crime

Where can a person find Louisiana criminal records?

The mission of the state is to maintain a thorough, up-to-date, comprehensive arrest and disposition information for arrested individuals and to make it accessible to all criminal justice agencies. 

Louisiana maintains information on criminal records, with the Louisiana State Police  Bureau of Criminal Identification and Information directly in charge of administration. The Louisiana Computerized Criminal History system (LACCH) contains arrest, disposition, and incarceration data on individuals that have been arrested in the state of Louisiana. This system also contains data on individuals that have applied for certain positions requiring a fingerprint-based background check. 

The majority of background checks done within the state require a signed authorization from the person being checked – you cannot run a check on another person as a private citizen. Employers, school districts, and licensing agencies have many options for requesting a background check. They can fill out a form with a signed authorization and fingerprint card and send it to the Bureau of Identification and Information.  

There is also an online background check portal that provides name-based background reports only.  Either of these options will return arrest and conviction information.

Louisiana inmate records

Inmate records in Louisiana consist of offenders that are held in state prisons, correctional inmate facilities, parish jails, and other penal institutions. They may also include information on sentencing, the class of the offense, the parish where the case was tried, and the facility location of the inmate. 

What’s on an inmate record?

The information listed on an inmate record varies, but in Louisiana the records usually contain a combination of personal information and specific details about a person’s incarceration situation. Public access to inmate records can provide the following information when accessed: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthdate, and gender
  • A mug shot
  • Inmate location
  • Inmate registration number
  • Jail transfer information
  • Custody status

Where can a person find Louisiana inmate records?

Through the Louisiana Department of Corrections, users are able to search for information on offenders within the Louisiana system. There are two ways to locate offenders in Louisiana – calling the Imprisoned Person Locator automated number (225-383-4580) that allows users to enter the offender’s DOC Number and get their current status. It is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week. Alternatively, you can go to www.Vinelink.com and do an online search where you will be given the offenders present location, a list of all convictions, and their earliest possible release date.

Louisiana court records

Court records in Louisiana provide a wealth of information produced from court proceedings. For people that are searching for court records, there are resources listed below. It’s important to remember that court records can be some of the most difficult records to procure since they are usually held across several courts in the state of Louisiana. 

What’s on a court record?

In the majority of cases, court records are quite large and come with several varying documents. Most people find these documents the most helpful: 

  • Court minutes
  • Case files
  • Dockets
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgement documentation
  • Jury records and files
  • Witness documentation

Where can a person find Louisiana court records?

Requesting court records in Louisiana is a bit difficult. Some courts have online portals while others don’t. To start your search, research the court where the case was heard online. Your research should tell you if the court offers online records. 

If you can’t find records online, visit or call the courthouse and speak with the clerk of courts to request records. Usually, district court records are found this way.

Louisiana Supreme Court records are available online and physically held at the Division of Archives, Records Management, and History. 

Louisiana vital records

Louisiana, like most states, has an office that maintains its vital records. Vital records are kept for birth records, marriage records, and death records. 

What information is needed to request a vital record?

A request for information can be done via Louisiana’s State Registrar & Vital Records site, where interested parties can provide relevant information about a specific record. This information may include:

  • The location of the event
  • The approximate date of the event
  • The full name of the person, including maiden names 
  • A case file number for divorce records
  • The license number for a marriage record

Where can a person find Louisiana vital records?

Birth and death certificates in Louisiana are administered by the State Registrar & Vital Records, a division of the state’s  Department of Health & Hospitals. 

Birth certificates are available for the last 100 years and death certificates the last 50 years. For either request, you must prove the right to the certificate, such as being a relative of the individual or a legal representative. 

There are a few ways to apply for a birth or death certificate in Louisiana, either in-person at the Vital Records Central office or by requesting certified copies online. 

To obtain a record, you’ll need to present photo identification and pay corresponding fees. Walk-in services accept cash, cashier’s check, money order, or a credit/debit card as forms of payment. 

Another option is to complete a request along with photo ID and accompanying fees to the PO Box for Louisiana’s Vital Records Registry. Note that at this time, because of COVID-19, in-person requests are not available. 

Frequently asked questions about Louisiana records

To further assist Louisiana citizens in their pursuit for public records, here’s a list of commonly asked questions: 

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes. Whether you live in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, or Miami, you can request records from the state. The law does state, however, that a person of the age of 18 or older must submit the request.

Is there a records custodian in Louisiana?

No, there is no designated records custodian for the state of Louisiana. However, the law says that the head of any public body can respond to records requests. 

What exemptions exist?

The legislative records in Louisiana are covered by the law, but many are classified as exempt via court ruling or statute

How long does that state have to respond?

The state agency is expected to respond within 3 days of a request, no matter whether the process is ongoing or not. 

Is there an appeals process in place?

Five days after submitting a request, there is the option to initiate legal proceedings. Unlike other states that have an administrative appeals process that goes through the attorney general, Louisiana has no such process. 

What fees are associated with requesting public records?

The agency that handles the request can only charge fees for situations in which the requester asks to search records outside of regular business hours. Then, a reasonable fee may be applicable.

  • Updated November 18, 2020
  • States

Guam Public Records

An unincorporated, organized territory of the United States located in the western Pacific Ocean, Guam is one of five U.S. territories with an established civilian government.  The largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands, and the largest island in Micronesia, Guam has a long history of colonization and the Guam Organic Act of 1950 established the island as an unincorporated organized territory of the U.S..   While its 161,000 residents are entitled to U.S. citizenship, Guam is not a U.S. state so citizens residing on Guam cannot vote in presidential elections and their congressional representatives are non-voting members of Congress.   Guam does make provisions for the sharing of its records with the public.

Guam  Public Records Laws

The Sunshine Law of 1987 was the original public records law in Guam and was revised in the Sunshine Reform Act of 1999, which can be found in Chapter 10, Article 1-3 of the Statutes.  The Law states that “every person” has the right to inspect and take copies of public documents in Guam.  The reason for the request does not need to be stated, and records may be used for any purpose once obtained.

Records that are covered under the law include any records from a public agency, including the executive, legislative and judicial branches.   Records that are not included, or are exempt, include:

  • Personnel records
  • Tax returns
  • Police blotters
  • Pending litigation records
  • Security-related records
  • Medical records
  • Library records
  • Test questions
  • University of Guam Financial Aid records
  • Investigatory records


Guam  Criminal Records, Arrest Records and Background Checks

Background checks in Guam are administered by the Guam Police Department.  They have no forms or instructions available on their website but do refer to these as a Police Clearance.  These record checks for the Territory of Guam only and are used for such things as pre-employment, adoption, licensing, and criminal justice cases.  Records returned are usually for convictions within the last 11 years, except for DWI, which doesn’t expire.   Fingerprinting may be required to run these reports.


Guam  Jail and Inmate Records

To learn about the corrections program on Guam, find services for victims, or to locate an inmate, you can visit the Guam Department of Corrections website.  Guam has only one correctional facility called Hagatna Adult Correctional Facility in Mangilao County (#3 Mashburn Lane, Mangiloa, GU 96913).  There is no online search function to locate inmates, but you can call the DOC at (671) 734-4566 with questions about location and visitation.

Guam Court Records

Information on any of the courts in Guam can be found on its administrator of the courts website.  The only online searches that can be done are of the court calendars for the Supreme Court and the Superior Court and the Guam Law Library, which is limited.  You can obtain copies of court documents by making a public records request with the clerk of the court in the courthouse where the case was heard.

Guam  Vital Records

Vital records in Guam, such as birth, death, and marriage certificates are administered by the Department of Health & Social Services, Office of Vital Statistics.  The office has birth and death records from October 26, 1901 to present.    There is no date available for marriage certificates. 

To obtain a birth, death, or marriage certificate, you must either be the person listed on the certificate or prove that you are a spouse, parent, child, or legal representative.  Send a completed application with proper documentation and payment to:  Office of Vital Statistics, 123 Chalan Kreta, Mangilao, Guam 96913.

Copies of divorce certificates must be requested directly from the court, and the cost of copying will vary.  Your request should go to:  Clerk, Superior Court of Guam, Guam Judicial Center, 120 West O’Brien Drive, Hagatna, Guam  96910.

  • Updated September 11, 2018
  • States

Montana Public Records

The State of Montana has one of the oldest traditions of freedom of information laws in the country. It first established laws promoting public access to documents in 1895. The state drafted a new constitution in 1972 requiring it to rewrite Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) laws.

While this sounds good, it is difficult to win FOIA cases in Montana because there are no penalties for government agencies that violated the act and there is also no administrative appeal. Montana also does not have a public records custodian, so there is virtually no way to force agencies to disclose information.

To help you access public records in Montana, this state-specific guide will provide direction to find criminal, inmate, court, and vital records. 

What does the Montana public records law say?

Any citizen from any state can request public information from government agencies within the State of Montana. No government departments, branches or agencies are exempted. However, exemptions are extremely broad so many specific items may be exempted. For instance, private writings and those with privacy issues, such as individual or public safety concerns as well as trade secrets) are the two listed exemptions. These can be interpreted in a variety of ways.

Also note, there is no enforcement of the freedom of information law in Montana and there is no administrative appeal.

There isn’t a specified time frame for government officials in Montana to respond to FOIA requests. There isn’t any case law that equates delaying a response to a request as a denial. All of this makes it incredibly difficult to appeal in court.

To learn more about public records search and what is spelled out in the Montana Constitution, you can visit Mt.gov.

How can a person access public records in Montana?

For public records access in Montana, a person must submit a public records request. The request is sent via mail, email, mail, or by phone to the record-holding department. 

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

In general, a public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID-19, some public offices may have limited hours of operation. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead.

Minnesota criminal records

The public can obtain criminal records for those in Montana, but it is challenging as most have to go through individual courts to obtain case history. Those who tend to seek out criminal records are employers doing background checks. Some charity groups and churches also require a background check before approving a volunteer’s application. Those seeking to adopt or foster a child can also expect to be included in a background check.

What’s on a criminal record?

A criminal record is a document that lists all contacts and interactions with law enforcement and the criminal courts. Depending on the state, it may not include cases where a person was charged but found innocent. It does list convictions and time spent in incarceration.

Most criminal records include five basic things:

  • The person’s name, nationality and birthday
  • A mugshot
  • A full set of fingerprints
  • A list of distinguishing features such as tattoos
  • A list of misdemeanor and felony crimes with descriptions.

Where can a person find Montana criminal records?

The Montana Department of Justice has a public record search for the state’s criminal record database. The service includes only the state’s public criminal history information. There is a $20 fee per request. You can use the service as a registered user or for public users.

Montana records include information such as:

  • Notations of arrests and identifiable descriptions
  • Complaints, indictments
  • Information filed in court and any related dispositions
  • Detentions and sentences
  • Correctional status
  • Release
  • Information in the State of Montana includes fingerprints, photos with some exceptions.

Montana inmate records

Montana has an estimated 1,495 inmates in all of its levels of prisons. Inmate records have a wealth of information that can be helpful on many levels. Employers find it beneficial to understand a person’s past or where they currently stand in their sentence. Likewise, reporters also use these types of services for stories related to either the person’s case or a topic that includes the case. Crime victims also regularly check the status of offenders to be prepared should they come up for parole or release.

What’s on an inmate record?

Montana offers basic information on its inmate records including the person’s legal name, gender and birthdate, a mug shot, their inmate registration and jail transfer information and the custody status.

Where can a person find Montana inmate records?

Montana has an online search site through the Montana Department of Corrections called the Correctional Offender Network Search. It is a free service but those seeking information do need to have the Department of Corrections identification number and the offender’s first and last name to do a search.

Those interested can also request the entire Montana Department of Corrections Offender Web database that includes victim’s information, the Board of Pardons and Parole, and sexual and violent offender registry.

Montana court records

Some of the largest files the public can obtain are court records. Because court cases tend to be complicated and involve a lot of testimony, briefs and evidence, they can be huge files. Court records typically contain all court transcripts and action related to a case. They also include dockets, case files, court minutes, court orders, sentencing and judgement records, as well as jury and witness documentation.

What’s on a court record?

Court records are typically large files of information and can include documents from several courts, depending on the case. It can contain all court transcripts as well as information on all action in a case. Some of the documents requesters find in court files include dockets, court minutes, case files, court orders, sentencing or judgement documentation, jury records and files and witness documentation.

Where can a person find Montana court records?

Montana doesn’t have a full online system for all court cases. You can look up Montana Supreme Court decisions through the Montana Judicial Branch website and also find the appropriate district and local court for your area.

However, those seeking court records will need to contact the local court or district court where the case was heard to obtain records. 

If you are unsure where to start, the local clerk of court for Superior Court is a good place to start, although someone seeking records could be referred to another court like probate or magistrate court, depending on where the case was heard.

Montana vital records

Most Americans will request a vital record at some point in their lives. Vital records are those marking lifetime events, such as a Montana birth, marriage, divorce, and death. These are records commonly used to obtain driver’s licenses, passports, participate in sports, go to school or geneology. People also may need them for security clearances for a new job or be hired at all.

What information is needed to request a vital record?

Those seeking vital records will need some information to obtain them. This has become a key issue because of privacy concerns. To request a vital record, the requester will need the approximate date and location of the event, the full name of the person involved (and that includes maiden names), and a case or license numbers for divorce or marriage records.

Where can a person find Montana vital records?

Those seeking vital records in Montana can do so through the state’s Department of Public Health and Human Services website. Requesters can order online, call a toll-free number to a third-party vendor called VitalCheck Network Inc, or place an order by mail. There is a fee and requesters must pay by credit card when ordering online or on the phone. Requesters can send a check by mail.

Birth certificates cost $12 each. Death certificates are $15 each.

If you prefer, you can request vital records like death records through the mail. You need to mail an application and a money order to the Department of Public Health and Human Services, PO Box 4210, Helena, MT 59604.

Montana requires identification to process requests. Proper identification is either a picture ID with a signature and date of birth such as driver’s license, state ID card, passport, military ID or tribal ID or two forms of identification where one contains a signature. These include things such as a social security card, work ID card, car registration, utility bill with current address, or voter registration card.

Frequently asked questions about Montana records

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes, a requester can live anywhere in the United States and get records from Montana.

Is there a records custodian in Minnesota?

No, there is no records custodian in Montana.

What exemptions exist?

There are broad exemptions to Montana’s Freedom of Information laws. Two are related to privacy and security issues. Both can be interpreted extremely broadly although the strictest interpretation is for trade secrets and personal or state security issues.

How long does that state have to respond?

There is no statute requiring state government agencies within Montana to reply within a specific time frame.

Is there an appeals process in place?

Yes and no. While requesters can take FOIA issues to court, there is no formal appeals process in Montana. Since there is no public records custodian, there is no agency to appeal a decision. The only answer is to file a lawsuit in court.

What fees are associated with requesting public records?

The state law says that fees associated with public records are $.10 a page to cover copying costs and search fees. Requesters get a half-hour of free search time but are charged $8.50 an hour for labor after that. There are no fee waivers.

  • Updated November 26, 2020
  • States

Kentucky Public Records

The search for public records in any state is never a direct line. Public records are usually scattered across multiple state agencies, which make them challenging to locate and request. 

You can save a lot of time and stress by knowing the state laws and it’s procedures for public records requests. 

This state-specific guide will inform you on all the pertinent rules to help you access specific public records. By using this guide, you will have all the information you need to access criminal, inmate, court, and vital records. 

What does the Kentucky public records law say?

According to Kentucky statutes currently in place, “all public records created, used or in its possession must be managed by the state.” The Kentucky Open Records Act consists of a set of laws that guarantee that public access to records is available at all levels in the state. 

The state’s executive and legislative branches are both subject to the law. The judicial branch is exempt. 

The state takes the law seriously. In subsequent years, Kentucky’s Attorney General has found that agencies that have failed to create a record management program are in direct violation of the Kentucky Open Records Act. The state pushes for transparency and strives to provide easy access to the public. 

Agencies in Kentucky must respond to a records request within three days. If the state office needs more time, a letter must be written to inform the requester of a 30-day extension. 

There are 13 exemptions to the state’s public records act, most of which are standard across the United States. 

To learn more, visit Kentucky.gov.

How can a person access public records in Kentucky?

Some records are available online while others will require a formal records request.  If a request is necessary, it can be sent via mail, email, or by phone to the record-holding department. 

Every department is different, so expect some variation to the rules if you’re accessing records from multiple places. 

In general, a public records request should include: 

  • Your name and contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address
  • The name of the document you want access to with as much detail as possible
  • A specific time period that you’d like to receive the materials by
  • How to deliver the documents, whether by email or mail

Due to COVID-19, some public offices may have limited hours of operation. As a result, online requests are best, but if you want to go in person you should call ahead. 

Kentucky criminal records

The criminal records in Kentucky, just as in all states, contain an official compilation of a person’s criminal history. These formal records are compiled from local, county, and state jurisdictions, and also courts and correctional facilities within the state. 

What’s on a criminal record?

A criminal record provides a person’s arrest records, convictions, and incarcerations within the state’s nine prisons. 

More specifically, a criminal record or a background check will provide the following information: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birth date, nationality, etc.
  • A mugshot and full set of fingerprints
  • A list of distinguishing features (tattoos, birthmarks, and other physical attributes)
  • The type of offense (misdemeanor or felony) and description of the crime

Where can a person find Kentucky criminal records?

Requests for criminal records in the state go through the Kentucky Court of Justice via their online portal. Through this site, name-based and public records reporting is available. Additionally, the Kentucky State Police administers background checks for licensing, criminal justice, and employment purposes. 

For a fee of $25, the Administrative Office of the Courts provides criminal records reports to individuals, companies, licensing agencies, government entities, and others. The AOC’s database is statewide through CourtNet 2.0, which collects court information from the local case management system in all of Kentucky’s 120 counties. CourtNet 2.0 possesses millions of Kentucky records that cover all misdemeanor and traffic cases for the last five years, plus felonies dating back to 1978. Note that criminal record reports do not contain driving or arrest records.

Kentucky inmate records

The Kentucky Department of Corrections manages all adult correctional facilities in the state, also setting the rules and standards for all county-run facilities. The KDOC manages 12 correctional facilities throughout the state.

Kentucky inmate records include the personal and official data of those that have been incarcerated in prisons and county jails within the state. 

What’s on an inmate record?

An inmate record usually contains a combination of personal information and specific details about a person’s incarceration situation. Public access to inmate records can provide the following information when accessed: 

  • Personal information like a person’s name, birthdate, and gender
  • A mug shot
  • Inmate location
  • Inmate registration number
  • Jail transfer information
  • Custody status

Where can a person find Kentucky inmate records?

The Kentucky corrections department provides a searchable database for people who are currently incarcerated in the state as well as previous inmates who have served their time.The Kentucky inmate finder is available via the Kentucky Department of Corrections website. An inmate search is possible in Kentucky by using the legal first and last name of the inmate in question or by their aliases.

You can also conduct advanced searches by entering a Department of Corrections ID number, offender type, supervision status, location, age, crime or conviction date, race, gender, and location. When conducting your search, check a box to be able to view any available photographs of the inmate. If there is a mugshot available in the system, you will be able to see a photograph and know whether you recognize the individual. The more information entered into the system, the easier it is to narrow your search.

You can also search for formerly incarcerated inmates who are out on probation or parole, former convicts who are listed in the sex offender database, and people who are otherwise under community supervision.

If you are looking for inmates who were recently arrested or convicted in Kentucky, you might have some trouble finding them through the database. According to the Kentucky Department of Corrections website, it may take more than 120 days for new offender data to be finalized and entered into the system.

Kentucky court records

In Kentucky, the Supreme Court serves as the highest legal authority, and thus has the power to oversee decisions made by lesser courts. This means that the Supreme Court can check any decision made by the Court of Appeals, plus weigh in on any legal conflicts and questions.

The Court of Appeals then acts in a similar manner over district courts and circuit courts, reviewing decisions made when one party contests a decision. 

What’s on a court record?

In the majority of cases, court records are quite large and come with several varying documents. Most people find these documents the most helpful: 

  • Court minutes
  • Case files
  • Dockets
  • Orders of the court
  • Judgement documentation
  • Jury records and files
  • Witness documentation

Where can a person find Kentucky court records?

Information on the Kentucky court system can be obtained through the administrator of the courts website. The state has its own online CourtNet website where criminal and cican be searched which provides the corresponding copies that can be requested through the appropriate courthouse.

Public entities that must produce records include all state and local government offices.  This also includes the executive and legislative branches, and any body that receives at least 25 percent of its funds from the state. The judicial branch is not subject to the law per case law via the state Supreme Court. Records that are exempt include:

  • Personal information
  • Trade secrets
  • Medical files
  • Examination data
  • Law enforcement records
  • Records made exempt by statute

Kentucky vital records

The Office of Vital Statistics (OVS) is in charge of milestone records like birth certificates, death certificates, marriage certificates, and divorce records. They can help citizens get certified copies as well.  

The Office of Vital Statistics does not provide birth records or death records prior to 1911, except delayed records of births for those born before 1911 which have been established through affidavits and documentary evidence.

What information is needed to request a vital record?

A request for information can be done via the Kentucky Office of Vital Statistics site, where interested parties can provide relevant information about a specific record. This information may include:

  • The location of the event
  • The approximate date of the event
  • The full name of the person, including maiden names 
  • A case file number for divorce records
  • The license number for a marriage record
  • A form of identification like drivers licenses

Where can a person find Kentucky vital records?

The Office of Vital Statistics maintains the vital records in the state of Kentucky. Requests for copies of records must be done in writing and made via mail, online forms, or in-person. There is also the possibility to request and purchase records online or receive them through the mail. 

Due to COVID-19, all in-person services for OVS have been suspended until further notice. However, mail-in and online orders for certificates are also available. You can submit mail-in orders to the Office of Vital Statistics in Frankfort, Kentucky. The website will update information as situations change. 

Frequently asked questions about Kentucky records

To further assist citizens in their public records search, here’s a list of commonly asked questions: 

Can a request be submitted by non-residents of the state?

Yes. Whether you live in Fayette, Louisville, and New York City, residency doesn’t matter. Anyone can request records. 

Is there a records custodian in Kentucky?

No. 

Are property records public?

Yes. You can speak with the county clerk to conduct a deeds check. 

What exemptions exist?

There are 13 exemptions in KORA, with the majority of these more or less standard with what can be seen in other state’s FOIA statutes. There are certain categories of personal information in regards to civilians, trade secrets, police methods and active investigations, reports, laws, preliminary drafts, homeland security, public agency real estate purchases, patient medical records, and certain academic examinations are all under exemption status. A more thorough breakdown of exemptions can be found on the state’s transparency site.

How long does that state have to respond?

Agencies in the state of Kentucky have three days to deny or accept a request. If more time is necessary, these agencies will write a letter informing the requester of their 30-day extension. 

Is there an appeals process in place?

There is the possibility to appeal, but it’s quicker to administratively appeal to the Attorney General of Kentucky. 

What fees are associated with requesting public records?

Government agencies are not allowed to charge for searches, but noncommercial requests are subject to copying fees. For noncommercial requests, agencies can charge the actual cost for the time spent making copies of records. Commercial requests are subject to fees at reasonable prices. Expect to pay around 10 cents per page. 

  • Updated December 8, 2020
  • States